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Extremely slow after new hardware install


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#1
Aleema

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I'm really hoping to get some help or tips on this ... because, as a college student, I really can't afford to pay a small fortune for repair.

My previous DVD+/-R-LightScribe drive called it quits a few days ago, so I bought a new drive very similar to it. I've installed lots of parts to computers before, but I fear I might've damaged or dislodged something on the motherboard this time. Upon booting my CPU up after install of the new drive, my computer has been impossibly slow! It takes 30 minutes for the computer to complete the startup process and even then, I'm at 100% CPU usage. I've managed to run an array of antivirius/antispyware programs, just to dispell the idea that many will have that it's a software issue. I honestly believe it's a hardware/system configuartion issue which is why I really need help.

I replaced the master of 2 cdrom drives, though the jumpers for both are set to "cable select". And they should both be set to "DMA if possible." I have a 500w power supply and I did not upgrade my hardware, just replaced it, so power should not be a problem. All functions of the computer work fine, it's just VERY slow. The RAM and other features/plugs all appear to be snug in their places. I have more than enough space left on my harddrive and this slowness was immediately after installing the new hardware.

Was I supposed to uninstall/disable my previous drive before taking it out? Cdrom drives don't have software drivers that I need, right? I've tried plugging and unplugging the CD drives all kinds of ways, so I'm a little dismayed that the drives might not be the problem at all.

Please help this poor college girl. >_<
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#2
The Skeptic

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Go to control panel > system > hardware > device manager. Expand DVD / CD-Rom drives. Uninstall the drivers you see listed. Restart the computer and let windows reinstall the necessary drivers.
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#3
Aleema

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Did what you said, but the problem still remains, unchanged. Sorry!
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#4
The Skeptic

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Press control + alt + del to enter task manager. Go to "processes" and see (in cpu coloumn) which processes are heavy users. How much "system idle process" takes (actually it doesn't take. It shows you how much free cpu resources are available).

Go to "performance", physical memory, and report the total and how much is available.
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#5
Aleema

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System Idle Process: 28k
Physical Memory: 915952 (total), ~515670 (available), system cache aprox. the difference

I've already checked my processes, and nothing is taking up memory or space that is being shown. explore and ie are only taking up about 75,000k total, and the computer runs slow if both are not running.
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#6
The Skeptic

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Look in the theird coloumn from the left, marked cpu. This shows you how much processing power (measured in percent) is being used by a process. In an idling computer "system idle processes" should be around 95. Please check again and report.

Ram usage looks normal.

Please do the following:

1: Disconnect the flat cable that connects the motherboard to the DVD drives. Disconnect it at the motherboard side. This will enable testing the system without the drives and cable.

2: Download Everest home edition from here. Install it and go to computer > sensor. wait few seconds until data shows up and report cpu temperature.

Edited by The Skeptic, 13 February 2007 - 12:24 PM.

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#7
Aleema

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Sorry, I was rushing to class when I replied and didn't read your post fully. In the CPU collumn, it says that "system" is taking 99% of resources. But "system idle process" is at 0%.

I will now do as you requested and edit my post when done. Right now, CPU temperatue is around 115F, 46C.
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#8
The Skeptic

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cpu temperature is normal. Task manager shows enormous use of cpu resources. Please disconnect the flat cable and check task manager again.
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#9
Aleema

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I have disconnected the cable, and conditions remain the same; system at 99, temperature is the same.
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#10
The Skeptic

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Please download and run BurninTest from here. This is a good hardware testing software, free for 30 days. Run it while the the flat cable is disconnected. In your next post please include a report of the test.
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#11
Aleema

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Okay, did that. I've uploaded my results:
http://www.freewebs....rnInTestLog.htm
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#12
The Skeptic

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I have done some research about the system 99% and couldn't find a clear cut answer. Most attribute the problem to malware. This doesn't seem to be the case in your computer. I would do the following:

1: disconnect everything which is not essential (usb devices, speakers etc.). Start the computer. If still no good:

2: Reset Bios. To do so disconnect the computer from the wall socket or psu connection, open the side cover and carefully pull out the cmos battery. Keep it out for 20 minutes. Reinstall, connect the power and restart. You may get an error message which should disappear when you reset time and date in the bios. If still no good:

3: I would take off the hard disk and attach it to another computer as a slave. While there, you can use the other computer's tools to run thourough malware scans. I would run updated antivirus, Spybot search and destroy, AVG antispyware. The last two are free and effective.

4: While on the other computer run a scan of the disk. My computer > right click the icon of the attached HD, > properties > tools > error checking. Check the two boxes and click OK. It's quite a lengthy process.
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#13
Aleema

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Okay, I was finally able to secure a second computer and the overall results are a big "no." And, once again, it's very clear that it's not a malware problem. We should drop the theory as it takes forever and a day to fully scan my computer at this speed. Everything you had suggested I had already done, just not the "in another computer" bit, but that didn't seem to help any.

I researched it a little myself, and some people say that their problems were an IRQ conflict. However, I do not see a labeled conflict in my device manager, but I'm afraid I do not know how to manually look for conflicts when it is not recognized by the computer itself. In other words, I'm not sure what I'd be looking for.

But that's more of the kind of problem (system configs) I suspect is wrong with my system.
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#14
SuperSam

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Despite scanners not being able to find anything, it is still entirely possible to suspect a malware problem. When somebody is helping you, you should never "drop" an idea, by a system process using 99% of CPU continuously I would definately consider it as a malware issue.
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#15
The Skeptic

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What we did so far was to partially test the hardware. What we tested seems to be working well (BurninTest etc). All the steps that we took were necessary to narrow possibilities. What we haven't checked are the operating system and the motherboar. Geeks to Go do not advise formatting but had I been in your place I would definitely try it before coming to the conclusion that something in the motherboard is damaged.

Regarding malware: In a previous post I wrote that I don't think that this causes your problem because the slowness seems to be related in time to the changes you made with your cd drives. However, in eliminating problems, I always take steps which aim to confirm or negate certain possibilities. If we don't do this we play with guesswork
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