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#1
interpolarity

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of the i386 folder?....another question= how can i reduce the size of pagefile.sys, and are there any risks in doing so?...last question= when I reformatted my computer, it reinstalled itself to how it was when I first got it. Is there any way to alter that? Like have it not install McAfee, and install Firefox..etc? That would make it a lot more appealing to reformat my computer in case of a crash....
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#2
piper

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Hey again.

1. I386 folder. See this explanation.

2. Page file. Rule of thumb is 1.5 times the amount of RAM. I wouldn't want to go lower than that. To change it, right click My Computer, Properties, Advanced, Perfromance Settings, Advanced, Virtual Memory Change.

3. If you reinstalling from a manufacturer restore disc, then no, I don't believe you can alter it in any way. I may be wrong on that....
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#3
Spider-Man

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From a lovely Google search, I have produced the following:

The i386 folder holds the files used to install, repair, modify, update and rebuild Windows. Though these files are also located on your Windows installation CD (if you have one), I recommend you not delete anything located here. Deleting these files won’t recover much room, and the convenience of having the files there save a lot of time for us techie-types.

Basically, although it is not 100% manditory, it could still cause problems with your OS if you delete them and the space you save really isn't worth the risk - therefore I'd advise you not do delete or edit the files.
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#4
piper

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Here is an explanation of the Page File. I neglected to include that in my previous post.
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#5
interpolarity

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so, my last 2 questions were related...is there anyway to take things out of the i386 folder/put things in and edit the setup process to have the computer reformat the way I want? ie. should I delete all traces of mcafee from it if I don't want it when I reformat?

and how do I find out how much RAM i have?

Edited by interpolarity, 13 February 2007 - 05:45 PM.

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#6
interpolarity

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Ok...i got the pagefile down pat, but I still have questions about i386.
I reformatted my computer once before, when stubborn spyware couldn't be removed. I did so w/o the use of a CD...I rebooted, and pressed ctrl+f12. When everything was done, the computer was like it was when we first got it. From what I looked up, the i386 folder was the only thing not deleted in the process of reformatting the computer. Would that mean that putting additional files in the i386 folder would allow me to transfer files and programs etc. if/when I want to reformat again?

For example: My computer needs to be reformatted, and before I do so, I put in the i386 folder all my important files, and the setups of important programs in a zip file. Would this zip file be found in the i386 folder AFTER the reformat? Also, Could I edit some of the files in that folder to change what programs would be installed during the reformat, what others wouldn't? Is there a program to edit .exe?

Sorry for the terribly long post....

Edited by interpolarity, 13 February 2007 - 09:48 PM.

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#7
piper

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I don't know. It sounds like you've got a branded laptop and you're doing a special recovery from the hard drive. Which brand it is?
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#8
dsenette

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For example: My computer needs to be reformatted, and before I do so, I put in the i386 folder all my important files, and the setups of important programs in a zip file. Would this zip file be found in the i386 folder AFTER the reformat? Also, Could I edit some of the files in that folder to change what programs would be installed during the reformat, what others wouldn't? Is there a program to edit .exe?

Sorry for the terribly long post....

nope...the i386 folder is not used during the reinstall...if you were able to see it (with proper software/setup you could) you would see a second partition on your hard drive...a pretty small one in fact...that partition is what controls the ctrl f11 restore on your computer...not the i386 folder...the i386 folder is used for System File Protection...basically system file protection watches your system files and replaces them when they get changed or damaged...or when you run an SFC /scannow operation...
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#9
interpolarity

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all right, thanx...
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#10
123Runner

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There are ways to build a installation CD from recovery CD's and also to slipstream in SP2.
I do not have that info right now, but "Google it" and you will get some info.

I suspect that you would be able to create a install CD from the I386 folder on the HD because the procedure when using recovery cd's uses the I386 folder.

I will see what I can find for info.
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