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SATA 4-port adapter/card


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#1
Denisejm

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I recently built a computer that has a Biostar TFORCE 6100-939 motherboard. It has two 7-pin internal SATA ports.

I installed a Seagate Barracuda SATA 7200.10 hard drive which is connected to one of the 7-pin ports using a 7-pin to 7-pin SATA cable. I have 4 external SATA hard drives. I've been looking for an adapter/card that I could install so that I can connect the hard drives using a SATA connection but I haven't been able to find one anywhere. It isn't possible to connect the port card in the usual way. There is no SATA connection near the rear of the case. I would have to purchase one that has a plug so that I can connect it the same way I connected the internal hard drive.

The first picture is the motherboard and the second picture shows the SATA ports on the motherboard, and you can see where the ports are in relation to the rear of the case.

Can anyone help me out?

Denise

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  • Biostar_TFORCE_6100_939___Picture.jpg

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#2
Scott3344

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Are you looking for something like this pci card? It allows 4 internal SATA connections. I'm sure you can find it cheaper if you poke around.
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#3
Denisejm

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I want an adapter that does what the Promise card does but I don't have a port for it. I need to be able to connect the adapter to the case so that the 4 ports are facing outwards and 1 port facing inward that would fit a 7-pin to 7-pin cable, the same way I have my hard drive connected to the motherboard. It has to be able to be connected to the motherboard SATA port. I included a picture of the type of cable that I need to plug into the motherboard port and the port for the external 4-port SATA card. I need 4 SATA ports available on the outside of the case. Or a 4-port SATA HUB.

The first attachment is a picture of an L-bracket supporting 4 SATA external ports. I attached it to my case. I thought that the part that faced inward would have just one port for a SATA 7-pin cable and I was going to attach the other end of the cable to the 7-pin SATA port in my computer. But the adapter has 4 internal ports for the 4 external ports so that I would need to attach the 4 internal ports to 4 SATA ports on my motherboard, but I have only 1 SATA port on my motherboard that's available. That would give me only 1 external SATA port, unless there are SATA HUBs.

The second attachment is a picture of the Promise card. It has the set of pins that won't fit into any port on my motherboard.

The third attachment is a picture of the 7-pin to 7-pin cable that will fit in the SATA port on my motherboard. I have no other SATA ports on my motherboard. The other end of this cable needs to connect to a 4-port adapter for all 4 ports . . . 1 cable for 4 external SATA ports.

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  • Promise_SATA300_TX4_BULK_4_PORT_sata_pci_Adapter.jpg

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Edited by Denisejm, 02 March 2007 - 11:03 PM.

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#4
Scott3344

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Ok - but I think with expansion cards you don't need to actually hook up a SATA cable from the card to a SATA port on the motherboard. Rather, the expansion card plugs into the motherboard. This is a card that would give you 4 external ports you could plug your external drives into. The card itself doesn't need to be connected to the SATA port on your motherboard - the card exchanges data directly with the motherboard through the PCI slot. This is an example - there are cheaper ones out there that aren't as fancy.

If you're talking about a simple cable solution (e.g., a 1 - to - 4 cable "splitter" that turns one cable from your remaining motherboard port into 4 external SATA ports), I'm not sure that's possible. I'm not a SATA expert but I believe the rule is that each SATA device needs its own data channel. So, I having 4 devices sharing that one port on your motherboard would end up working.
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#5
Denisejm

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Ok, I think I see what you're saying. Even though it's a SATA card, it can be connected to an IDE port? Comparing the pins and the layout of the pins on the card, I don't have an IDE port on my motherboard that would accommodate the card. I have 2 standard IDE ports and 1 high speed port. The pins on the high speed port look similar to the pins on the Promise card that you showed me

The high speed port is the 4th from the left in the picture, almost next to the chipset.

Edited by Denisejm, 02 March 2007 - 11:29 PM.

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#6
Scott3344

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Not exactly. Take a look at the picture of your motherboard that you posted. The two yellow slots on the upper left of the picture (the 2 that are the same size) are your PCI slots.

After you buy a SATA card like the ones I mentioned, you plug that card into one of the PCI slots. Follow the card's instructions to configure the card. Then, you should be done.

You should be able to connect your 4 external SATA drives to the ports on the card (for the second card I mentioned, the ports would be external ports). There is no need to create a connection between the new SATA card and the open SATA port on your motherboard. There is also no need to create any other connection (e.g. IDE). The card is communicating all of the data through the PCI slot on the motherboard that you plugged it into.

The slot that is 4th from the left looks like your PCI-e x16 slot which you might want to reserve for your graphics card.
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#7
Denisejm

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The Promise card and the eSATA PCI-X 4 Port Card - CalDigit FASTA-4x that you posted a link to here don't have the same layout of pins as the PCI slots.

Your picture of the Promise card shows a small groups of pins, a long group of pins, then a small group of pins. That layout would support the high speed port, ie., for graphics card.

The CalDigit card has a small group of pins, a long group of pins, a small group of pins, a long group of pins.

........ .......................................... ......... <-layout of pins on Promise/similar card

........ .......................................... ......... <- layout of pins on high speed port

........................................ ......... <- layout of pins on PCI ports

........ ...................... ......... .................... <-eSATA PCI-X 4 Port Card - CalDigit FASTA-4x

The number of pins aren't the same as the number of dots, but the layout is the same. Does this matter? How will I know if the card has too many pins for the PCI slots?

Edited by Denisejm, 03 March 2007 - 12:30 AM.

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#8
Scott3344

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I ususally just go by the hardware specs since the card tongue configuration can have spaces that won't affect the ability to to use it in the slot. Your motherboard specs say you have 1 Pci-e x16, 1Pci-e x1 and 2 regular PCI slots. The promise card is a regular pci and should work in a pci slot. The eSATA card is a pci-x card, so will work in a PCI slot but have some pins that aren't plugged in (if you plugged it into a full pci-x slot the performance would be faster, but you don't have a pci-x slot on your motherboard). Seems like most of the cards available are pci-x.

I searched in Newegg.com which I've found to be the best place to buy computer components. Take a look here for their selection of this type of card. I noticed another card has the 4 external ports and also 4 internal ports. Also a pci-x card but should work in your pci slot. If there's a problem with a Newegg card you have a 30-day return ability and Newegg has a good reputation for handling returns.
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#9
Denisejm

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So if I bought the

NORCO-4618 PCI-X / PCI eSATA / SATA II / SATA I RAID Controller Card which has this pin layout:

........ ...................... ......... ....................
http://www.newegg.co...N82E16816133002




and my pci port has this pin layout

........................................ .........



It would work with some of the pins hanging off the end of the port?



I don't have 4 internal SATA port to connect the 4 external ports. I would need a converter, as we first spoke about, which I would plug into the 4 internal ports of the cart and have one 7-pin port on the other end of the adapter which I would plug into the interal SATA port in my computer. Since this type of adapter doesn't exist, I can't use a STA card that has 4 internal and 4 external ports.

By the way, I'm not going to be setting up a RAID array so it doesn't matter if a card can't do this.

Edited by Denisejm, 03 March 2007 - 12:30 PM.

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#10
Scott3344

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Yes I think that would work, lined up like:

card:

........ ...................... ......... ....................

slot:

............................... .........
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#11
Denisejm

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For $70.00 plus mailing fees, it'll have to wait a short while, but I'll try it. Thanks for helping. :whistling:
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