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Advice on buying an ethernet bridge?


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#1
King Lud

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Hi experts,

A while back I posted on what I thought was a rather hopeless situation:

We
a) have ruled out a wireless router for security reasons,
b) don't really want wires trailing all over the house,
c) don't have much money or
d) expertise but
e) do want the internet upstairs ASAP in rooms without telephone points.

As usual, I received some very helpful advice:

Your house is already wired for a network. Here is some of what is available to turn the power lines in your home into a wired network. Most of the less expensive ones are usually around 14mbps which is fast enough for most broadband connections. There are powerline adapters that are capable of 300mbps.


:whistling: Anyway, I'm very grateful and convinced something like this is the answer. As I have a netgear router, (think it's this one: http://www.amazon.co...t...904&sr=1-1) I want something that is compatible and have almost decided on buying two of these (to connect my bedroom to the internet):

http://www.amazon.co...g...0350&sr=1-2

However, aware that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing (and I have a VERY little!), I would really appreciate someone giving me the confidence to go ahead and/or pointing out potential pitfalls. In particular,

- are they really *that* easy to use?
- is there anything else I need to buy?
- what is the catch?! anything else I should know?

Thanks guys! :blink:

Edited by King Lud, 13 April 2007 - 10:49 AM.

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#2
Neil Jones

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Absolute waste of time in my own personal opinion, plus they tie up your electric sockets too. They really do look more trouble than they are worth.

If you have a wireless router already, just get some network cards or wireless dongles for the computer(s) upstairs and tell them to connect to the router you have already; you don't need another one.
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#3
ComputerMouse

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Oh dear.

Have heard some good things about ethernet bridge plugs, to the effect that you just plug them in and they work. Too good to be true, I suppose?

P.S. Have a wired router already, which isn't working very well. (And it's not a good look!)

Don't want a wireless router (too concerned about the security implications, I'm afraid) - so reckoned this would be safer.

Edited by ComputerMouse, 14 April 2007 - 06:11 AM.

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#4
Neil Jones

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If you want to buy and use electric bridge plugs, that's entirely up to you. I just personally believe it makes heavy weather of something that can be easily done with one device that only takes up one plug.
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#5
SpaceCowboy706

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Neil Jones must have hit the crack pipe or has never used them... :whistling: I work for the third largest cable internet provider in the world and we have substituted cat5 wired networks in residential installations for the linksys homeplugs. I have installed about a hundred of them (not to mention my own home at one point) and they work flawlessly provided you follow two simple rules: Rule 1) never plug them in to a surge protected power strip, Rule 2) Never install one where the router homeplug is on the other end of the romex that passes through the breaker panel (fuses in the breaker panel wreak havoc on the signal).

Follow those two rules (just like our installers) king lud and you wont go wrong... and if you cant figure something out after you buy them and install them, post for me in the forum and ill get you straightened out.

PS.... i cant vouch for the ease of installation for netgears version as i have never used them but i can for this one. Which is compatible with your router.

Edited by SpaceCowboy706, 15 April 2007 - 09:36 AM.

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#6
King Lud

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Thanks, SpaceCowboy706 - I might well take you up on it!
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