Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Windows ACPI help!


  • Please log in to reply

#1
Matth3w

Matth3w

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
Ok, here is the basic situation...

All of my music (mp3, games, streams, etc) stutters during playback. I don't know why or when this started occurring.

This is my system:

Windows XP Home
P4 3.0gHz
2GB RAM
10k RPM hard drive
Sound Blaster 5.1 PCI sound card
Latest drivers
3GB page file, only 277MB used
2-4% CPU usage at any given time
Sound card on IRQ 18 with SATA hard drive controller

This is what I have done to try to combat the problem:

1) Defrag
2) Download the newest drivers for everything
3) Try different program (WMP, RealPlayer, iTunes, etc)
4) Move the file to different hard drive
5) Scan for spyware using Hijackthis, Ad Aware, Spy Sweeper, and MS Defender
6) Move the PCI card to a different slot (won't work because of ACPI)

So as a last resort I changed the driver for "Computer" in the device manager to "Standard PC." It tells me I need to restart the computer afterwards.

When I restart the computer it starts up Windows and presumably starts reinstalling drivers (in addition to telling me Windows needs to be re-activated).

After it is done, it tells me to restart the computer to finish everything.

OK - HERE IS WHERE THE PROBLEM BEGINS!!!

At this point I have two options (I have tried both with the same results):

1) Restart the computer, which locks up on the Windows XP black screen (eventually the green squares just stop moving and never start up again). Trying to start in safe mode does not work either. The only way I can get back into Windows is to choose last known good configuration, which leads me in a loop of going back to Windows, reinstalling all drivers, and asking me to reboot, etc....going back in a circle.

2) Choose no to restarting the computer and play my music. Now the SB card is on IRQ 11 and NO SKIPPING AT ALL!!!

So my questions are:

1) How can I make the computer work with Standard PC enabled, or

2) What else can I do or program can I use to move the IRQ of the Sound Card or SATA controller, or otherwise fix this annoying problem?

My stipulations are:

1) No complete re-install of Windows

Any help that fixes this problem could eventually end up in some sort of PayPal payment for you. This is how pissed I am right now.
  • 0

Advertisements


#2
Neil Jones

Neil Jones

    Member 5k

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,476 posts
Many people experience this problem because of the concept of IRQ Sharing. Previously IRQs only had 0 to 16 and ever increasing amounts of peripherals to fight with - way more than 16. The resolution was to share IRQs between devices based on the assumption that the two devices would not be needed at the same time so you put unrelated devices together. This is fine for the most part, but audio devices often ended up having to share with something else.

In most cases you can change IRQs by shoving your sound card into a different PCI slot. Try to avoid PCI slot 1 as it tends to have to share IRQs with the graphics card, while slot 3 tends to share with USB. This may be changeable in the system BIOS though. While you're in there turn off any devices that you don't use. So if you don't use the parallel port, the serial port or the network port, turn them all off. Talking of USB devices, USB can be a pain in the behind when it wants to be as you quite often end up with many devices that want the system's attention. For troubleshooting cut down on them.
  • 0

#3
Matth3w

Matth3w

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts

Many people experience this problem because of the concept of IRQ Sharing. Previously IRQs only had 0 to 16 and ever increasing amounts of peripherals to fight with - way more than 16. The resolution was to share IRQs between devices based on the assumption that the two devices would not be needed at the same time so you put unrelated devices together. This is fine for the most part, but audio devices often ended up having to share with something else.

In most cases you can change IRQs by shoving your sound card into a different PCI slot. Try to avoid PCI slot 1 as it tends to have to share IRQs with the graphics card, while slot 3 tends to share with USB. This may be changeable in the system BIOS though. While you're in there turn off any devices that you don't use. So if you don't use the parallel port, the serial port or the network port, turn them all off. Talking of USB devices, USB can be a pain in the behind when it wants to be as you quite often end up with many devices that want the system's attention. For troubleshooting cut down on them.

I only have three USB devices at this time (keyboard, mouse, and hub that has three cords for digital cameras etc plugged in but not being used). You can't change the IRQ of a card by moving the slot or changing things in the BIOS because that all goes out the window when Windows XP takes over via ACPI.
  • 0

#4
Neil Jones

Neil Jones

    Member 5k

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,476 posts
Some peripherals and some boards will change the physical IRQs given to the cards when you go through POST after changing PCI slots. XP generally should respect this unless its using newer ACPI tables supposed by the mainboard which allows it to spread the IRQ range up to 24. Using "Standard PC" limits the range up to 15 and most boards will assign, during POST, sound to IRQ11. The days of manually setting IRQs disappeared when XP came out. One option might be going in the BIOS and reserving IRQs - previously modems had to be on IRQ5 which you had to reserve specially from the BIOS in the first place. Some PCI cards are still fussy about this.

Anyway from Microsoft:

Note that you should not attempt to change from an ACPI HAL to a standard HAL or from a standard HAL to a ACPI HAL under any circumstances. Doing so will result in your computer not starting properly or at all. This occurs because the Plug and Play device tree that would be currently loaded is for ACPI, and it does not get reconstructed or revert to a standard HAL Plug and Play device tree. Because of this (the device tree structures being drastically different), the system is unaware of any hardware changes after the computer restarts to include the location of the boot device. Microsoft does not recommend or support this procedure as it will result in data loss.


  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP