Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Creating a Custom Recovery Disc


  • Please log in to reply

#1
Malikorx

Malikorx

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 107 posts
I have a Gateway MX6440. It came with the usual OS install disc and two Recovery CDs. I can use the OS install disc to reinstall Windows and then pop in one of the Recovery discs and let Windows automatically install what's on the disc. This restores the computer to factory default settings. I am attempting to take what's on Recovery Disc 1 and remove the trial applications off of it. I will then take the two applications on Recovery Disc 2 and place them on Disc 1. Is this possible, and if so, how would I go about doing it?
  • 0

Advertisements


#2
Neil Jones

Neil Jones

    Member 5k

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,476 posts
Not really because the recovery CDs are designed to do either everything or nothing. They're a cheap and cheerful way of a worst case scenario for end users. They're not designed to be butchered in this way.
  • 0

#3
Malikorx

Malikorx

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 107 posts
Makes sense. Is there a way I can make my own recovery CD and put my drivers on it and SP2 and possibly a few other programs? Make it somehow automatically install it all for me?
  • 0

#4
Neil Jones

Neil Jones

    Member 5k

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,476 posts
Perfectly possible.
http://ghost.radified.com/ is an idea, others are available. What you might want to do is set up an installation, install your service pack 2 and your drivers, configure the system as you like it, then use Ghost or any other cloning program to save it to either a separate drive or a CD. So if you want to wipe the system in a few months time when it gets bogged down in the usual fashion, just clone this image back and you're as you were.
  • 0

#5
Malikorx

Malikorx

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 107 posts
Sounds like exactly what I'm looking for. Thank you so much!

Now what about this: I know you can order SP2 on a CD from Microsoft. Anyway I can make my own?
  • 0

#6
Malikorx

Malikorx

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 107 posts
There are programs such as Bart's PE Builder which can be used to remake a Windows install CD and you can slipstream SP2 into the install. Bart's PE Builder is used to make an Ultimate Boot CD. This CD will use your currently installed OS to make an ISO image that can be put on a CD. When the ISO is burned to a CD and ran, it will replace your normal Start menu with a simplified version with links to certain programs that were installed on the computer that the ISO was created on. The certain programs include antispyware, antivirus, disgnostics, etc. I want this so that I can run it on another computer and use the programs I have off of the CD. The only problem is that I can't with my version of XP because I'm using an OEM version and that won't work. Is there a program that will do what I'm looking for but not use my current Windows install or Windows XP install CD? I do not have access to someone else's XP CD, else I'd use theirs. I want it to be able to boot into a simple Linux or Windows environment and allow me to run programs such as Ad-Aware, Registry Mechanic, diagnostics and others.
  • 0

#7
Neil Jones

Neil Jones

    Member 5k

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,476 posts
You can slipstream on any version of Windows XP, OEM or Upgrade. You only might not be able to do it if your computer manufacturer has only supplied the i386 folder. But if you have a full OEM CD you can slipstream with it no problem.

Edited by Neil Jones, 11 May 2007 - 05:16 PM.

  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP