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Certifications VS Bachelors Degree


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#1
Titan8990

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I have been out of high school for a couple years now and I'm ready to go back to school. I have a job that pays for it and everything. I will be starting at the local community college this summer. I am trying to descide if it would be better for me to get multiple computer related certifications or a bachelors degree in computer science. I think that I could easily get a A+ certification w/o a class. A computer science degree would require a transfer to a university. I am looking at this from a finacial perspective because I think that I would be happy with just about any computer or technical related job.

I will appreciate any advice or suggestions that you all may have.

Edited by Titan8990, 17 May 2007 - 02:12 PM.

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#2
dsenette

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your best bet would be to get an actual degree...most companies don't actually put much weight on certifications these days (maybe because they've been burnt by someone with an A+ cert that didn't know what a modem was)...but all companies tend to desire if not require some form of formal degree....

from personal experience...if you're wanting to go back to school to advance your career...then you need to pick a specialty...like networking, or computer repair, or something like that.....just doing computer science usually isn't enough for a company to pick you out of the group of applicants...whereas if they have a large network that they are in need of managing...if they see that you have a networking specific degree...they're more likely to give you a second look
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#3
bobmad

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I second much of what dsenette says. A degree means you can set a goal, apply yourself, and stick to it even when it's tough. I have a BSE in computer systems from a known university.
I wish I would have gone to a different type of school. ITT Tech or DeVry type. I learned a LOT of theory, programming, math, science and background stuff. I got crushed in the job market when I graduated (bad timing because the "dotcom" bubble burst just before I graduated) because while I knew more than many other students I didn't have a clear focus to my knowledge.

Specializing in networks or whatever will help.

If I had it to do over again I wouldn't have put my wife and kids through that whole ordeal. I'd go to a school that taught a very focused curriculum. I also would pick up certs while I was doing the school thing. Some schools have classes that teach much of the certification stuff, and offer discounts for the tests.
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#4
dsenette

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ITT Tech or DeVry type

i went to ITT...got a 2 year associates in computer networking systems...i've got a very good job as a network admin....i've got some friends who have 4 year bachelor's in computer science from (as they call it) "real schools"...who work at borders book stores...specialization will get you in the door..and once y ou're there the company might help to further your education
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#5
Titan8990

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Thank you for the input. I will have a look at ITT Tech because I know they have a local campus here. The community college here is one of the most disorganized opperations I have ever seen. I would rather not have to go there if I didn't have to. Plus I saw a specialization on the ITT Tech website that caught my eye.

You all have gave me some things to think about, thanks.
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#6
anzenketh

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Here I go digging up old threads again but hay this is the community type threads. I am glad I ran into this thread. Because I am at a turning point right now in a similar situation of Titan. Only I have 1-2 years worth of community college behind me I was thinking of going to ITT tech because i like the specialization Idea but at the same time I have 2-3 years worth of community college behind me. How come life always has the hard decisions.
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#7
dsenette

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Only I have 1-2 years worth of community college behind me I was thinking of going to ITT tech because i like the specialization Idea but at the same time I have 2-3 years worth of community college behind me. How come life always has the hard decisions.

give your local campus a call and set up a meeting with a "recruiter"...make sure to bring your transcripts, there's a chance that your community college credits might transfer for some of the "remedial" or non technical classes at ITT....that's one of the things that can help there...they usually accept credits from most other schools as long as the classwork is the same...however ITT credits won't transfer anywhere
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#8
Falco98

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I have a bachelor in Computer Science from the University of Maryland, and can't even seem to get hired as an IT guy at small local companies. They look at me like a cow in the headlights and ask, "so... you don't even have an A+?"
grumble :'(
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