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PC Will Not Even Power On


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#1
keithr128

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When I got home this evening I tried to power on my pc and nothing at all happened. (It was on this morning)
So I disconnected all the wires, removed the side panel,set it on my kitchen table and plugged just the power cord in and listened closely to see if I could hear any noise when I turned on the switch on the back of the psu.
The only noise I heard was a faint chirp when I turned the switch off.
I really hope my baby that I spent almost 2 weeks assembling with care just recently was not fried by a power surge because I am sure Belkin does not cover custom built systems.
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#2
macten

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My first thought is a dead power supply. What brand psu unit did you install? Does the psu fan spin?

edit...always assume that there is AC power in the motherboard. Don't touch anything.
edit...connect all of the wires again. Make sure there is power at the outlet. Make sure the psu is set to 115 volts. Make sure switch on back of psu is 'on'. Try the power button again. Does the fan on the psu spin? Does the LED on the motherboard light up? If it does you can backprobe the motherboard connector with a volt meter: (or buy a psu tester...$15-25)

(Do you have the CPU power cable plugged in? Should be 4 or 8 pin.)

http://www.hardwarel...2006-03-25.html
http://www.realworld...i...0000000&p=4

Here's a technique of shorting the black and green wires. Make sure the pc is unplugged and throw the switch on the back of the psu to the off position and short the green and black wires on the motherboard connector with a paper clip or piece of wire. Plug it in and throw the switch on the back of the psu. Does the fan on the psu come on? Anything else happen?
http://www.sysopt.co...cle.php/3532716


If your not getting anywhere, take the motherboard out of the case and connect the keyboard and monitor and short the two switch pins on the motherboard (with a screwdriver)where the switch is normally plugged in. Anything?

Keep in mind, the psu should always be connected to a load when turned on.

Just making sure...you did use standoffs when you installed the motherboard?

Edited by macten, 30 May 2007 - 11:08 PM.

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#3
keithr128

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Hello macten, and thank you for your quick response.

I followed the instructions in the link you provided and the fan on the back of the psu came on as well as the fan that I connected to the psu so I will make sure that every connection is tightened if I still have the problem I will see if the power switch is defective by shorting the power switch pins as you suggested.

Yes I did put standoffs in. :whistling:

Edited by keithr128, 31 May 2007 - 08:10 AM.

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#4
keithr128

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Okay, so I took everything out of the case and reset the motherboard just to make sure that nothing was touching the case.
Then I put only the bare necessities(HD,RAM,Keyboard and Monitor) and tried unsuccessfully to jump the power switch jumpers. :help: :help: :whistling: :blink: :) :)

I am going to go to Staples tomorrow and buy an easy button, maybe that will work. :)
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#5
macten

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Are you sure you were shorting the right pins?
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#6
keithr128

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Positive.
I even broke out the manual for the motherboard to make sure.
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#7
macten

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I use a psu tester first. (That's why I posted that back-probing first....to find out what the voltages are.) It takes only a few minutes. This is what I use:

http://www.frozencpu...g11c28s88#blank

take a look at the second post (cody's guide):

http://www.cybertech...ead.php?t=81113
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#8
keithr128

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Hi macten,

Sorry for the delay in posting back.
I figured that before I bought a psu tester that I would would follow Cody's guide in the link you posted and I did not even get past the first step. (Having only the motherboard and cpu connected to the psu)
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#9
macten

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Hi macten,

Sorry for the delay in posting back.
I figured that before I bought a psu tester that I would would follow Cody's guide in the link you posted and I did not even get past the first step. (Having only the motherboard and cpu connected to the psu)


If your speaker was connected and you know it works and didn't hear any beeps then you've narrowed it down to either the psu, motherboard or cpu. Is your power supply ATX? If so it's about a 10 second check with a $15 tester you can buy at compusa or microcenter.

It looks like a big storm is rolling in. I've got to shut down. This looks like the type of storm where I'll throw the main breaker. I'll log on later tonight....I think...
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#10
keithr128

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You can close this thread macten. I bought a new mobo,cpu and decided to get a ups to make sure I dont end up with the same problem.
Thank You very much for your help.
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#11
admin

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FYI, before you scrap the old mobo, remove the battery, and short the CMOS reset jumper for a couple of days or more (with no power to the mobo), and see if that restores the default mobo settings. I once had a DFI motherboard that I was about ready to give up on, but after a week the CMOS reset and it's worked fine ever since. Even if that doesn't work you can likely contact the mobo mfg and get a replacement CMOS chip for $10-15.
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