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Possible problem with the hardware of my computer?


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#1
iceyJDP

iceyJDP

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Well, i recently bought a used shuttle pc with:
  • 1 Gig DDR ram
  • 120 GB harddrive
  • x800 XL Radeon 256MB AGP Card
  • Not quite sure on the motherboard as it is a micro mobo (I don't exactly think this is the problem, because if the mobo wsa damaged, i don't believe the computer would start up.)
Anyway. the problem arises several minutes after the computer has been on. I will be doing something (resource hoggy or not) and it will randomly restart my computer. I'm not sure if this is memory related or not (i don't think it is) I know it has to be something with the hardware, but i am not quick to lay a thumb on any of the pieces because i'm not sure what piece of damaged hardware produces this effect. If you know the most common reason for this problem, please tell me. Thanks

The ideas i have gathered that may explain the problem are:
  • Faulty driver
  • Bad memory
  • Bad fan rpm/voltage
  • Low power-supply
Last edited by iceyJDP at 2007-06-01 1:28 PM

EDIT: I am running vista ultimate on this machine and i ran a memory test diagnose. It finished one of the tests but about 7 or 8% into the second test, the computer randomly restarted. I'm not sure it is the ram. In fact, i am more geared toward it being the power supply or a bad fan.


Here is something to take a gander at:

These are the temperatures i got (which i checked right at startup:)

PWM Temp: 42 +/- 5 C
CPU Temp: 53 +/- 5 C
System Temp: 35 +/- 5 C


After like 5 minutes of the system being on, the temps varied to:


PWM: 55 C
CPU: 66 C
System: 42 C

Edited by iceyJDP, 01 June 2007 - 03:27 PM.

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#2
Neil Jones

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Reboots are usually caused by hardware issues. Mainboard, memory and power supply are all suspects as could be the memory on the graphics card. But Windows is quite good at rebooting itself for no apparent reason as well. You should swap bits out and try to isolate the problematic peripheral.
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#3
iceyJDP

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A few images, as you can see, there is an overheating problem:

Posted Image
Posted Image

I thought the problem at first could be that the cpu fan was not functioning properly, but no, i had tested the fan on another computer and then in the shuttle, and it worked fine in both. Since it is a shuttle, this is a picture of how the heat is transfered.

Posted Image

One possible guess for the overheating was that the thermal glue between the heat sink and cpu may be loose, thus causing a decrease in the heat flow transfer.

Edited by iceyJDP, 01 June 2007 - 10:20 PM.

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#4
ViprXX

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I'd try first to make sure the inside isn't totally clogged with dust and blow it out, which I'm sure you probably have. if thats not the problem make sure everything ex. memory, all cables, addon cards are securely connected. Or try to take the heatsink off the cpu and clean the thermal grease off of it and the cpu and reaply new thermal grease. make sure to reapply the correct amount. (do a search for how much to put on).

good luck.
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#5
iceyJDP

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Reapplying thermal heat was also another suggestion, but, would that really make a huge difference?

EDIT: I took the time to apply thermal compound (to my surprise, it had none applied at all) but, this still didn't fix my fairly high temps.

I read up on my site about the Shuttle model SN85G4 (The one i have) overheating and there are many people who have experienced this. One guy said it was the graphics card: that you cannot have a even a mid to high end card in it.


I've had an SN85G4, running AMD64 3000, 2 x 512MB ram.

Initially i had a 9600 Pro in it, then a 9800 Pro and after a month of use with it, i started getting problems. So next i exchanged the 9800Pro to a 6800 Vanilla (less power consumption).
At that time the unit was about 7 months old. It spent the next 3 or so months in service, as the unit kept rebooting. Also had network disconnections since the LAN chip would overheat from the general temp inside the box and it would kill the LAN connection. The mobo had to be replaced but the power supply was still weak. Problem is, i couldnt get a replacement power supply since, funly enough, Shuttle dont make spare PSU's for the SN85G4. With about 1 - 2 months warranty left i sold the unit, warning the buyer that he / she cannot put a beefy gfx card in it.

All in all, it wasnt a terrible experience, but not a good one either. It was a PC that lasted not a whole year and cost a crap load of money. Heat will definitley be a problem if you so much as think any mid to high end cards. Period.


Edited by iceyJDP, 02 June 2007 - 05:47 PM.

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