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impossible lap


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#1
AnthonyJ

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doesnt this look fake? the guy claims to have done it in 5 minutes.

also so this matches this section um upgrading to a e6300 and asus p5b deluxe and plan to have the e6300 running near 3.-3.5 ghz

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#2
james_8970

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It's a fake. Plain and simple there is no way the metal would become that reflective. Never mind get results that fast in 5 minutes. Lap is a slow process that requires several different grits, not only one which would be the only possible way of doing it in "5 minutes".
Also with the lighting you should see some glare or something, it's just to perfect.
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#3
stettybet0

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also, in the reflected image, there is no writing on the thing in the middle (not exactly sure what it is :whistling:), but on the actual thing there is. Also, in the reflection, the glue stuff is more brownish, while the actual stuff is much more white.
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#4
AnthonyJ

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It's a fake. Plain and simple there is no way the metal would become that reflective. Never mind get results that fast in 5 minutes. Lap is a slow process that requires several different grits, not only one which would be the only possible way of doing it in "5 minutes".
Also with the lighting you should see some glare or something, it's just to perfect.
James

thats what i said, and why isnt there a reflection from his thumb
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#5
AnthonyJ

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also, in the reflected image, there is no writing on the thing in the middle (not exactly sure what it is :whistling:), but on the actual thing there is. Also, in the reflection, the glue stuff is more brownish, while the actual stuff is much more white.

on a IHS the top is nickel plated, when you lap you usually remove the nickel and expose then polish the copper. and the words are still there, you just need to enlarge the pic
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#6
stettybet0

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Sorry if I wasn't clear, I was talking about the small red thing with glue underneath it in the middle of the actual chip. It has writing on it, but even in the enlarged picture, the writing isn't in the reflection.
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#7
james_8970

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also, in the reflected image, there is no writing on the thing in the middle (not exactly sure what it is :whistling:), but on the actual thing there is. Also, in the reflection, the glue stuff is more brownish, while the actual stuff is much more white.

on a IHS the top is nickel plated, when you lap you usually remove the nickel and expose then polish the copper. and the words are still there, you just need to enlarge the pic

This is normally the case for heatsinks but I don't believe there is any copper in a Proc.
James
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#8
AnthonyJ

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also, in the reflected image, there is no writing on the thing in the middle (not exactly sure what it is :whistling:), but on the actual thing there is. Also, in the reflection, the glue stuff is more brownish, while the actual stuff is much more white.

on a IHS the top is nickel plated, when you lap you usually remove the nickel and expose then polish the copper. and the words are still there, you just need to enlarge the pic

This is normally the case for heatsinks but I don't believe there is any copper in a Proc.
James

IHS are nickel plated copper plates, when people lap they usually keep going until thry get past the nickel, then start on the finer grit. on my new e6300 or e6320 which ever i decide. im going to lap it since ill be massively overcclocking, and dont worry i plan to keep core volt below 1.5v. unless i run across a very good deal for a phase changer
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#9
james_8970

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also, in the reflected image, there is no writing on the thing in the middle (not exactly sure what it is :whistling:), but on the actual thing there is. Also, in the reflection, the glue stuff is more brownish, while the actual stuff is much more white.

on a IHS the top is nickel plated, when you lap you usually remove the nickel and expose then polish the copper. and the words are still there, you just need to enlarge the pic

This is normally the case for heatsinks but I don't believe there is any copper in a Proc.
James

IHS are nickel plated copper plates, when people lap they usually keep going until thry get past the nickel, then start on the finer grit. on my new e6300 or e6320 which ever i decide. im going to lap it since ill be massively overcclocking, and dont worry i plan to keep core volt below 1.5v. unless i run across a very good deal for a phase changer

Interesting to know, never thought there was any copper in processors.
James
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