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Choosing a hard drive


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#1
the kazman

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I am planning on getting a new computer with three new hard drives, using one for the OS and Apps, one for Storage (movies, setups,etc.), and the other one for storing video files when i do video editing. I heard somewhere that a 10,000 rpm drive should be used when doing video editing. I have chosen one, the Western Digital Raptor WD1500ADFD 150GB. But i was wondering for which drive to use the WD raptor for; the OS drive where the video editing application is installed on, or the drive where the video files are stored? Thanks.
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#2
Troy

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I have to admit, I'm not an expert on video editing at all, but I would guess to use the 10k HDD as your OS/apps as that would give your whole system a small boost all the time...
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#3
Neil Jones

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Depending on how much raw video you intend to store or capture, it may be advisable to use the biggest one going for video storage.
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#4
Troy

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After a little more research, I've found that video editing computers require two things: lots of hdd space and cpu horsepower. Of course, you can ramp up the other things (like your graphics) if you wish, but if you do lots of video editing, make sure you have a powerful processor and heaps of storage!

If it helps, of course :whistling:
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#5
james_8970

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If you can get the 750GB barracuda from Seagate you'd be doing very well for yourself. Everything on one drive and there isn't a significant gap between this and the raptor. Or if you really want to do all out get the 1TB drive from Hitachi, it surpasses the Raptors in a few benchmarks, however overall the Raptor still has the performance crown.
There's one problem with 10,000 RPM drives though, since there are more moving parts and they are moving at a faster rate, the lifespan is shorter.
Your call but I recommend one of the large drives over the raptors.
To add one more thing, CPU power is MUCH more important to keep in mind then hard drives.
James
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