Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Geek, noun: 1. ...


  • Please log in to reply

#1
paolo

paolo

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 43 posts
OK, I'm going to be really geeky here.

The dictionary definition given for "geek" at the top of each page is cute, but there is an error in the pronunciation:

geek ('gēk), noun.
1. Obsessive Computer User: somebody who enjoys or takes pride in using computers or other technology, often to what others consider an excessive degree
2. Someone with greater than normal computer skills.

The stress mark (') is used in dictionaries to show which syllable is stressed (eg, 'fēd-băk [for "feedback"]). Two things are wrong:

1. Pronunciation schemes that use the symbol "ē" to represent the "ee" sound (as in "geek") generally put the stress mark after the stressed syllable.
2. The symbol is not used when there is only one syllable, as it is redundant.

So I think the stress mark should be removed.

I say this as a regular contributor to Wiktionary (en.wiktionary.org), the free online dictionary and linguistic companion to Wikipedia. I enter a lot of the pronunciations there, among other things.

Edited by paolo, 10 June 2007 - 11:55 AM.

  • 0

Advertisements


#2
stettybet0

stettybet0

    Trusted Tech

  • Technician
  • 2,579 posts
Our current pronunciation is correct. According to Merriam-Webster, (ˈgēk) is the correct pronunciation of geek.
  • 0

#3
paolo

paolo

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 43 posts
Thanks for the feedback. That's interesting - I've never seen a dictionary that used stress marks on monosyllables. Ah well, there you go.
  • 0

#4
admin

admin

    Founder Geek

  • Administrator
  • 24,504 posts
I have seen variations of the pronounciation. The one used in the header is printed on the back of a t-shirt I got from Microsoft. :whistling:
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP