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cheap computer build


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#16
Titan8990

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Umart.com.au provides the cheapest components in my local area, I just order them online and go and pick them up myself.

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I bet that is nice. I work at UPS and I don't want them touching my computer parts....
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#17
Troy

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I'll take it UPS does not equate uninterruptible power supply in this instance?

Edited by ruthandtroy, 24 June 2007 - 07:13 PM.

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#18
Titan8990

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United Parcel Service.
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#19
trentdk

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I just finished building a system kinda of based on what you guys are talking about. I normally go all out and buy the best of all the name brands, so it was difficult to cut back enough to build a budget gaming PC.

To the OP: Ya have to go with and AM2 proc, a good vid card, and then keep the rest generic. Took me awhile to find the generic parts that end up being great performers. For instance: the pcchips microATX mobo is very inexpensive, but works great, and can do safe overclocking.

This system was built in the $400s, all from newegg, and plays any game out there (see the videos of it playing bf2142 and cs:s):

budget gaming build

I was pleasantly surprised with how well it does, especially when I've spent almost that total cost on just a vid card :whistling:
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#20
Titan8990

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I try to steer people away from real generic things. They get the job done but in many cases not for very long...
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#21
trentdk

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Thats why I spent a couple days going through reviews and comments to pick out the "generic" items that are just as good, or have the potential to be "name brand". They're out there.... every brand has to start somewhere :blink:

edit: I agree. Usually I steer people away from "generic' computer parts, but in this case, I have used this particular board and recommend it for a budget AM2 machince. :whistling:

Edited by trentdk, 25 June 2007 - 04:41 PM.

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#22
happyrock

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the mobo selection is the most important part...that component alone decides what you can do and add later..
you want to spend a little more for features that, even though you won't be using them today, down the road you may want them..
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#23
james_8970

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Thought I haven't read this entire thread I want to echo what happyrck just mentioned. AM2+ is coming out in about 2 weeks and with it will come support for the upcoming processors from AMD. Much better upgradeable path, also some are rumoured to have PCI2.0, though that'll probably be significantly more.
James
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