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Quick CPU question


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#1
Junkman

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Why do CPUs of the same kind vary a little in specifications when you're looking at a list of ones to buy? I'm looking at AMD X2 4200+s and there are several listed for slightly different prices with slightly different voltages and temperatures. Is it just that the creation process allows for some variance, rather than being deliberate? And more importantly, how much does it matter which one I choose, and what is better? Lower temperature and voltage I suppose?
Thanks
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#2
Junkman

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Anyone? Please? :whistling:
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#3
Titan8990

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When they mass produce CPUs they go through a testing process when they are done. The ones that do not meet par are sold as a lower clock or in Intel's case, a Celeron. I assume thats how AMD has different varients. Also the book I read about the in was published in 2003 so that my no longer be valid. I would like to see a link to what you are refering to. I have never seen a CPU that listed what its temperature was supossed to be.

Edited by Titan8990, 03 July 2007 - 02:00 PM.

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#4
Neil Jones

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Why do CPUs of the same kind vary a little in specifications when you're looking at a list of ones to buy? I'm looking at AMD X2 4200+s and there are several listed for slightly different prices with slightly different voltages and temperatures. Is it just that the creation process allows for some variance, rather than being deliberate? And more importantly, how much does it matter which one I choose, and what is better? Lower temperature and voltage I suppose?
Thanks


Temperatures a CPU will reach will be dependent on the room dynamics of where your computer will live and the atmopshere. In a typical summer environment it'll obviously run hotter under idle conditions than it would in the winter. The quality of your case, cooling in your case and the quality of the heatsink/fan you use play a part. Therefore there is no "proper" temperature, in fact if you can't hold your finger on the side of the heatsink for more than two seconds while running, its too hot.

There are different revisions of processors - such as cache size, physical processor speed, how well it'll overclock, what features it has, what features it doesn't have, etc. Most people really don't care which revision of a processor they have as long as their computer does what they want when they want.
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#5
Junkman

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http://www.edbpriser...u...&Submit.y=8

I hope that lengthy link works. That's the search result page for the hardware search engine I use for shops here in Denmark. In Danish obviously, but I think you can see the temperature and Voltage differences among the different 4200s.

I didn't think the differences would be significant, I was just a little concerned that they might signify a cheap version or something.

Thanks for the help
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#6
Titan8990

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I think that is most likely the temperature in which they begin to fail or slowdown to protect themselves.
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