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Distro lightest on system resources?


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#1
I.D.S. Administrator

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Xubuntu is... Okay-ish. The only reason I use it is because it is extremely light on system resources, which you want if you have one computer controlling 12 others. However, I would change distros with whatever was lighter on system resources.

This is all for servers / networking.
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#2
mpfeif101

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Check out Slackware, uses very little resources.
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#3
silverbeard

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It all depends on what your wanting in a system. What do you need and what are you willing to give up to get it?

Do you want a desktop with all the bells and whistles or is a minimal desktop an option?

Since you mentioned Xubuntu I would suggest Zenwalk. It's Slackware based and well thought out as to what is in it and what is needed to get a working desktop system. light as distros go and stable with a good repository of packages to install.
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#4
I.D.S. Administrator

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I will definetely check out slackware. I just want to install the OS on my web / ftp server. I barely go on it, and when I do it is just to check out how everything is running.
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#5
Bobbydoo8

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I really like Fedora Core because it seems to work pretty well, but will take more system resources than Slackware......I've used slackware server in the past and it also performs quite well
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#6
pyrocajun2707

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I'd definitely have to say Zenwalk. I use it on an experimental system that I built, and I find that It's so light on resources I can install it on just about anything, even a 466mhz celeron with 128 mb SDRAM!

However, if you want a little more functionality and user-friendliness, I'd reccomend Xubuntu, though I believe Zenwalk is lighter.

(Another one I've heard of is Featherweight Linux, though I have yet to test it.)
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#7
shard92

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I have used both puppy and slax and they work quite well but they are mainly designed to run from cd.... I think they both can be installed though.... Puppy is kind of nice because it will run from cd and save settings, etc to a thumbdrive....
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#8
I.D.S. Administrator

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I see... Well I think I will go with slackware.
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#9
silverbeard

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I just installed Slackware 12.0 on my latest machine and it is quite impressive. Very fast and stable. It had no trouble loading the ATI X1650 video card without having to load the proprietary drivers. The 2.6.21.5 SMP kernel recognized the AMD 64 FX60 2x with no trouble. Everything loads in a flash and I haven't had any issue using packages from the 11.0 repositories. It's pretty sweet and a large improvement over Slackware 9.0 (the last one I tried some while back).

The Slackware installer is still not as fancy as some of the more popular distros but it's quite good and has the options I like when installing a system. I like to set up fstab to my liking and not just let the installer select everything and set the mount points. It's nice to have a choice of installing it all or do a verbose installation and select only the packages you need/want. The choices of windows managers is very nice (I defaulted to KDE) but had six? to choose from and can still load any of the windows managers after log in(i use a non graphical shell log in).

I don't think you are going to regret using Slackware. It's a good choice.
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