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Facebook could be forced to close next week


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#1
Retired Tech

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Facebook, the popular social networking site could be forced to close next week throwing thousands of addicted fans into chaos has a long-running legal dispute comes to an end.

The case, which has been running for over three years, is between Facebook and rival social networking site ConnectU.

A decision, which is due on Wednesday 25 July in a federal court in the US will determine whether Facebook's founder Mark Zuckerberg copied the code for the network from three fellow Harvard students.

Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss, and Divya Narendra claim Zuckerberg took the source code to their site and business plan and used them to launch Facebook in 2003 while he was a programmer for their site.

http://uk.news.yahoo...ne-57dbc65.html
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#2
admin

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*admin offers 10:1 odds they aren't going anywhere.
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#3
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Don't suppose offers of 3 Billion GBP / 6 Billion USD for Facebook have anything to do with the other lot wanting the assets transferred to them
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#4
Codeman0013

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I agree with what slasdot said why did they wait almost 4 years to make this decision and finalize the suit? This should have been done a long time ago if it was needed to be done...
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#5
ScorpioWulf

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Simply because they can. Why sue a business worth $1,000 when you can sue a business worth $1,000,000,000?
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#6
james_8970

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Like scorpiowulf said it's history repeating itself, look at Youtube, there were no lawsuits till google bought them and was forced to begin cencoring things out.

At "worst" the website would be transfered to new owners, the ones who suposidly created the code. The site has to muchc value for them to just shut thier doors, neither side would want this to happen. Or this is my take on it anyways, I find the site rather annoying and could care less of the outcome.
James
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#7
burntchips

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its a good thing i don't use facebook. but then im certain it wont go anywhere. how much was myspace sold for?
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#8
ScorpioWulf

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I use Facebook and I find it a great way to keep in touch with people.
I would certainly rather them pay out a 7 figure sum than shut down the site.
It's useful.
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#9
Major Payne

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Update on trial from yesterday:

Opening credits roll for Facebook's colorful court hearing

Ron
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#10
mmusic

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I don't think it's that easy to solve. This type of case most likely take a while to end. Hey, we're talking a lot of money here.... :whistling:

Cheers!!!!
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#11
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Privacy fears as Facebook reveals member list

Facebook, the internet networking phenomenon, is to open its member list to internet search engines, prompting privacy concerns among its 39 million users.

The California-based site today started notifying members of its decision to make member names and photographs available to non-members using popular search engines such as Google or Yahoo.

Until now, Facebook has not allowed external websites to trawl its member database, which includes about 5 million UK users.

Only Facebook members have been able to type in the names of friends and acquaintances to see whether they have a profile.

Starting early next month, non-members will be able to use a new search box on Facebook’s home page - www.facebook.com - to search for names on the site.

http://www.telegraph...05/wface105.xml
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#12
Ryan

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And there were privacy concerns when Facebook introduced the applications. Which people love now. They just didn't know how it worked, and they thought that the developers would have access to their usernames and passwords.

And there were also concerns when the mini-feed was brought out. Which some people love, some people hate, and other's just don't care. (I love it, its like the RSS of facebook).

Whenever there has been something that people think will reduce the privacy of its users, Facebook has always reworked its privacy tools to help the registered user. It'll be the same way in this case.

In the end, privacy is all in the user's hands. If they don't want someone to find out their phone number, AIM screen name, or something, then they shouldn't have posted it. The internet only knows what you or someone else puts on it. Be careful and you should be fine.
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