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Abused Animals


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#1
keithr128

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Let's try this again shall we?
Use this thread to help spread awareness, share success stories, provide useful information and links to ease the suffering of these poor creatures.

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Edited by keithr128, 17 October 2007 - 02:43 AM.

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#2
keithr128

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Why Spay or Neuter?

* If you think that just having one or two litters won't hurt anybody, this fact should change your mind: according to the Humane Society of the United States, 10,000 babies are born in the U.S. on any given day. On that same day, however, 70,000 puppies and kittens are born. Match those two statistics up, and you'll see that there will never be enough homes for all the animals born in this country unless we all take responsibility for spaying and neutering our pets. Change begins with YOU! Spay or neuter your pet!

* Spayed/neutered pets live longer, healthier lives

* Spaying your female pet greatly reduces the risk of breast cancer and completely eliminates the threat of uterine and ovarian cancer.

* Neutering your male pet prevents testicular cancer and prostate problems, and helps him avoid serious health problems like hernias and perianal tumors.

* Males neutered at a young age are far less likely to develop dominance or aggression-related behavior problems, including possession and food guarding, territory marking (lifting his leg on everything in sight), aggression toward other dogs, and "humping" inappropriate objects.

* Neutering your male pet relieves him of the constant urge to go out in search of a female in heat. Ridding him of his urge to roam could very well save his life, and save you from a terrible broken heart.

* Spaying your dog or cat eliminates her heat cycle and the mess that goes with it. Also, females in heat often cry and howl incessantly, develop nervous behavior, and attract every unaltered male dog in the neighborhood to your yard!

* Altered animals are generally more docile and easier to train

* In the span of seven years, an unspayed cat and her offspring can produce 370,000 kittens!

* In the span of six years, an unspayed dog and her offspring can produce 67,000 puppies!

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Edited by keithr128, 17 October 2007 - 02:44 AM.

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#3
keithr128

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Removed

Edited by keithr128, 17 October 2007 - 02:44 AM.

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#4
harrythook

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Sounds like a great crusade to take on.

My wife is a Vet-Tech, and went on a couple of those spay/neuter trips around the country (USA).
My oldest 2 daughters belong to a bunch of the groups promoting healthy animal education, and the oldest is about to start college in a related field.

Sorry to say, the loose animals as a rule don't come from people that visit sites like this. The education that you wish to spread needs to be on the streets, in the community that has greater problems.

Keep up the good work, good cause.

:whistling: :blink: :help:
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#5
keithr128

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Border Collie Foils Deadly Knife Attack
This story is from 5 years ago

EAST LONDON (South Africa) — When a knife-wielding assailant has you by the shirt and is repeatedly stabbing your neck, your best hope for survival might come on four legs, as demonstrated by a heroic Border Collie named "Lassie".

Independent Online reports that Peta-Jayne Smith, of Gonubie, was ambushed by two would-be robbers in her home on Nov. 1. Ms. Smith says that her husband John was away on a fishing trip, and she was busy at the computer when the lights went out suddenly around midnight. She lit a candle and went to the kitchen to investigate, and that's when she saw a blade coming at her.1

Ms. Smith received a deep wound to the neck which narrowly missed her jugular vein. The assailant was about to stab her again when a flash of fur intervened.

"The intruder had me by the jersey and was coming at me with his knife when Lassie jumped between us, pushing him away and setting me free from his grip," says Ms. Smith.

"It appears as though the intruders were so taken aback by Lassie's actions that they fled the house immediately."

Ms. Smith ran to the neighbors for assistance and was taken to a hospital where she received 13 stitches to close her neck wound.

"It would be safe to say that Lassie saved me from further injury and possibly death," she says. "What more proof do you need to prove that man's best friend is his dog?"


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#6
keithr128

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Brentwood man confesses to setting dog on fire


:whistling: :blink: :help: :help: :) :) :) :) :( :(
http://www.newsday.c...y-top-headlines
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#7
Guest_MarkN_*

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Honestly people what kind of person would want to harm an innocent animal. I know individual human psychology has alot to do with this type of abuse. Obviously we cannot change their psyche, so all we can do is try to help the animals. Please, everyone try to help and do what ever they can to prevent these people from comitting these crimes.
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#8
warriorscot

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It does at least serve the purpose of indicating dangerous behaviour before it progresses into something dangerous to human life, personally i can see why people can be cruel to another human at times but harming an animal for no reason really is something terrible and really takes a certain mentality.

You can't spay every dog and really its a little unfair certainly spaying pets is a good idea but you also want to have both a controlled breeding and wild breeding in dog populations otherwise they wont survive as a species and unless its in the public health interest i dont think you should go around spaying wild dogs. So a dog can produce allot of offspring, only as many as can survive in the environment will. I always found it interesting that while dog populations are controlled most other domesticated animal populations aren't ive always found it strange especially in rural areas where their are large populations of wild cats including big cats, it seems dogs are penalised for being more friendly towards humans a dog, even a wild dog will come to a human a wild cat will rarely do so.

I suppose i have weird ideas on animal control i tend to leave things to their own devices, nature usually sorts itself out of its own accord and i dont generally think you should mess with it unless it endangers human life.
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#9
Guest_MarkN_*

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A point for all of us to ponder. We try to control the population of all species but our own. Scientists believe our planet can only naturally sustain about 9 billion people, we are getting close to that number quickly. What then? China has population control. Will we eat our selves out of house and home?
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#10
Johanna

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Here in the US, one of the top news stories is Micheal Vick, a star quarterback for the Atlanta Falcons, who has been indicted (that means he's facing charges, not convicted) for dog fighting. The formal indictment paperwork seems to be thoroughly completed and presents damning evidence against him. The atrocities done to these dogs has caused Vick to lose his popularity and become the target of animal activists and many other ordinary citizens, enraged by the cruelty he and his friends engaged in. Dogfighting is not pretty, and in the American consciousness, it ranks with beating up old ladies and child molestation as reasons to despise and imprison participants. I wonder why a man with a bright future in the NFL would throw it all away to finance and organize dog fights? Even if he is acquitted (unlikely!) he won't be playing football again, and he'll be lucky to get a job flipping burgers.

MarkN, this thread is about animal abuse, not human overpopulation. Spaying and neutering pets is responsible pet ownership for all the reasons Keith listed, and probably a few more. Please stay on topic, and if you can't, start a new thread.
Johanna
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#11
Guest_MarkN_*

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Point taken Johanna, hopefuly if there is enough evidence to convict Michael Vick they will. Human behavior astounds me at times. I still don't understand bull fighting. A guy stabs an animal to death and it draws that many people to watch. CRAZY. Hopefully Vick will lose his job with the Falcons but it seems alot of these stars get away with quite abit because of their popularity and tickets they sell. Staying on topic would include your comment "beating up old ladies and child molestation" I would imagine. And how is spaying or neuturing related to animal abuse?

Edited by MarkN, 25 July 2007 - 04:29 AM.

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#12
`Power

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"Magnum, a loving and gentle albino Great Dane, was shot three times in his head, neck and shoulders and left to die in the woods outside of Prince George after his guardian found the hearing impaired dog too much trouble to keep. Miraculously the seriously-wounded dog survived and was spotted by a local resident who immediately called the SPCA. Magnum received more than 70 stitches to close his gaping wounds and lacerations and was treated for the severe dehydration he suffered as a result of his ordeal. The SPCA kept the injured dog safe and well cared-for in a loving foster home while searching for a Great Dane rescue group who could help find Magnum a permanent home. Luckily, they were able to locate a group that not only specialized in the breed, but which had a specific mission to find nurturing homes for deaf Great Danes. Arrangements were made for Magnum’s trip from Prince George to Oregon, where he is now happily living. "



Sad, but true.

~ `Power

Edited by `Power, 25 July 2007 - 07:47 AM.

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#13
warriorscot

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I was watching a program where they were spaying goats last night, gotta say it had to be one of the worst things ive ever seen.

I think beating up old ladies and child molestation are quite allot worse than dog fighting, which while cruel isnt exactly an uncommon thing.
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#14
dsenette

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You can't spay every dog and really its a little unfair certainly spaying pets is a good idea but you also want to have both a controlled breeding and wild breeding in dog populations otherwise they wont survive as a species and unless its in the public health interest i dont think you should go around spaying wild dogs.

....there is a difference between "wild dogs" and stray dogs (the same as the difference between stray cats and feral cats) i don't think there has ever been a government that suggest spaying and neutering WILD dogs...however there are a lot of groups wanting to spay and neuter STRAY DOGS....stray dogs are domesticated species of dogs that are no longer in someones home...wild dogs are of a species that has NEVER been domesticated....wild dogs were put where they are (give or take a few feet) by nature...the only reason stray dogs exist is because of PEOPLE....we domesticated a species then allowed people who can't take care of them try to own one...they can't handle it so they let them loose...these animals breeding is not a good thing....stray dogs transmit more disease and cause more vehicle accidents than wild dogs because even if they were born stray..they're still domesticated to not fear humans the same way wild dogs who have never been domesticated do..

same goes with cats...feral cats are species that were NEVER domesticated....they might share some characteristics with house cats...but they are in fact a different species...stray cats however have been domesticated...and fit the same issues as stray dogs...so their population should be controlled

So a dog can produce allot of offspring, only as many as can survive in the environment will. I always found it interesting that while dog populations are controlled most other domesticated animal populations aren't

dog and cat populations are controlled (or at least tried to)...as far as stray domestic animals are concerned...there are no other domesticated animals whose population NEEDS to be controlled...we eat cows as fast as their born...there isn't a huge boom in horse population....never heard of a stray ferret infestation....but you do see towns overrun with stray cats and dogs..therefore the need for control..

ive always found it strange especially in rural areas where their are large populations of wild cats including big cats, it seems dogs are penalised for being more friendly towards humans a dog, even a wild dog will come to a human a wild cat will rarely do so.

...confusing wild with stray again...a stray dog was once in someones home (or at least a rellative of that stray)...so it knows people....same with stray cats...but cats tend to loose their people skills faster than dogs
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#15
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very good points dsenette, you are right on the money with those comments. Any domesticated animal is just that, domesticated by humans.
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