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Attaching new hard drive...


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#1
Chopin

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When trying to attach my new 320-GB hard drive (SATA/300 interface, from Seagate), the "manual" (it's about five pages long, the rest is on the CD) says that when attaching drives larger than 137 GB my computer has to have better than 48-bit BIOS. Where can I find out if my computer has better than 48 bit BIOS?
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#2
Samm

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As a general rule you should be able to get a fairly good idea based purely on the date of your current bios - this is normally flashed up quickly when you first switch the computer on (i.e during the memory check). Alternatively try going into the bios to see if the date is in there.

48 bit LBA support came in circa 2003 so if your bios is dated later than 2003, there's a good chance it will support 48bit LBA. Obviously the later the date, the better your chances are. If your bios doesn't currently support 48bit LBA, then it's still worth checking the motherboard manufacturer's website for bios updates.
Note that your bios won't have 'better than' 48bit support, that's just poor wording in the manual - all you require is 48bit LBA support

Even if your bios doesn't support 48bit LBA and there's no update available for this, then as a last resort you could use drive overlay software to force the bios to 'see' the drive's full capacity. The drive manufacturers website (in your case, Seagate) would be the best place to look for DDO (dynamic drive overlay) software.

The only really sure way to find out if your bios does support 48 bit LBA however, is simply to connect up the drive & see if the bios recognises the full capacity (i.e 320GB or there abouts)

Edited by Samm, 24 July 2007 - 06:54 PM.

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#3
98springer

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Deleted.

Edited by 98springer, 24 July 2007 - 06:57 PM.

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#4
Chopin

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Well, I got it connected successfully... it showed about 298.3 GB. No problems. Thanks :whistling:
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