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How do i assign static IP address to mycomputer?


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#1
cobhcf

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Hi lads,
i was wondering, how do you go about setting static IP to computers?. Is there any way of doing it?... Just wondering! ;)

Cheers! :tazz:
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#2
chicagotech

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quoted from http://www.howtonetworking.com

How to setup TCP/IP in Windows 2000

Requirements:

1. The Client for Microsoft Networks and TCP/IP components should be installed.
2. There is at least one NIC in the computer.


1. Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel
2. Under Control Panel, Select Network Connections > Local Area Network or any connection you want to setup TCP/IP
3. Right-click on it and choose Properties.
4. Highlight Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and choose Properties.
5. Under This connection uses the following items, select internet Protocol Internet (TCP/IP).
6. Under General tab, the default should be Obtain an IP address automatically and Obtain DNS server addresses automatically.
7. If you want to change to static IP, check Use the following IP address.
8. Type IP address, Subnet mask and Default Gateway, for example IP=192.168.254.2, mask=255.255.255.0 and DG=192.168.254.1.
9. Check Use the following DNS server address. If you have an internal DNS, enter here. If not, you should enter your ISP DNS.
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#3
cobhcf

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Thanks mate,
"or example IP=192.168.254.2, mask=255.255.255.0 and DG=192.168.254.1."
What is mask and DG?, what is it used for? is there any pattern i shuld follow?

Cheers! :tazz:
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#4
Samm

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Hi there

Mask is subnet mask - if you set up a few machines on a LAN, then you normally keep the static IP addresses identical except for the number after the last dot. This final number identifies the individual machine obviously. Subnet masks hides some of the IP address when routing packets through the network.
EG
255.255.255.0 (the usual one to use) hides everything except the last number of the ip address, making routing quicker.

DG - default gateway
This is the IP address of the system(eg local server) that the machine needs to connect to.
So, in the above example,
the server would be assigned an IP of 192.168.254.1
the workstation assigned an IP of 192.168.254.2
the DG for that workstation assigned IP of 192.168.254.1
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#5
rich-m

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Just a quick questions?

If I wanted a Static IP address to access the web, for example I wanted to host an FTP site, would this have to be authorised and submitted from my ISP?

If so then the above example of the 192.168....wouldnt work would it?

Ta
Rich
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#6
garf12

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No you would have to buy a static ip address from your ISP. The 192.168.X.X is the IP address of your internal network ONLY.
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#7
rich-m

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Thanks for the reply -

so what you are saying is that all ISP's have a range if static IP's which can be bought by a customer? I imagine it would be a public address something like 82......etc

Just curious thats all.

Ta
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#8
garf12

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Not sure about all, but everyone I have used has had an option of buying a static account. They are usually pretty pricey and aimed mainly at business users.
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#9
rich-m

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Not sure about all, but everyone I have used has had an option of buying a static account.  They are usually pretty pricey and aimed mainly at business users.

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Thanks very much for your replies mate.

Cheers
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#10
Jye

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well i have posted this in other post but i find no-ip easy to use and free too, works fine if running a home server and you turn off pc a lot
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