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Wireless G and Wireless (Draft N)


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#1
Chicken mania

Chicken mania

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Hey, my family is planning to go wireless(new ISP, new plan: 3mbps) for all our computers so I thought I might do some asking first about Wireless N and Wireless G.

First, we have 3 computers(1 wireless enabled, 2 are not). This means that we'd likely go for the ethernet modem(likely a Speedstream ST536v6) and hook it up to a router and get 1 PCI and 1 PCMIA wireless card.

Secondly, I've been doing some research 'cos I knew next to nothing about Wi-fi. But now I know a lot more than before.

a) Is it true that Draft N allows for your wireless connection to be almost as fast as a wired connection? How is that so?
b) The maximum connectivity speed for Wireless G(even if the router is less than 1m to 8m away) is about 60% to 80%, right?? Though I've been reading up on wireless, I'm still not sure what else affects connectivity other than distance and interference like walls, floors and doors. I've heard about terms like throughput, hi-gain and bi-directional antenna affecting connectivity but they're still a bit foreign to me.
c) Also, I've heard that for Wimax, the higher your floor is, the better. Does this apply to Wifi?
d) And finally, can you connect a Wireless G modem to a Wireless N router and Wireless N cards? The modem which the ISP will supply will likely be the Speedtouch ST536v6.

Mmm... I'm asking because it looks like I'd be better off getting Wireless N(I don't really know about the cost, though).
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#2
dsenette

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might be able to try to answer SOME of that...not all of it


d) And finally, can you connect a Wireless G modem to a Wireless N router and Wireless N cards? The modem which the ISP will supply will likely be the Speedtouch ST536v6

well...if you're getting a wired modem (should be...as all wireless routers/modems have ethernet ports as well) then you can connect it to any router...the wireless portion is irrellivant with regards to the wired ethernet parts.

draft N is backwards compatable (as is 802.11G) which means that it can handle traffic from N, G, and B devices. so a G nic can connect to an N router...and an N nic can connect to a G router (however...the connection speed will only be that of the slowest protocol...so your N device will be moving at G speed)


a) Is it true that Draft N allows for your wireless connection to be almost as fast as a wired connection? How is that so?

it's all about the wavelengths of the radio waves used.....radio energy travels in waves (like sound waves). you could imagine the data being like styrofoam pellets on the surface of a pool...if you start a ripple (set of waves) you'll see the pellets getting carried along the tops of the waves away from the place where you started the wave....if you make one slow wave...you'll see that a few of the pellets will move away from the center....now if you make a bunch of reallly fast waves....you'll see that alot more of the pellets can be moved in the same amount of time

this is kind of how radio transmissions work...the faster the wave is traveling...the more info it can carry in a shorter period of time...which is how you increase the speed of radio transmission...however...you have to tweak the signal to make sure that you're not losing data on the way because the speed's too high for the reciever...etc...etc..


c) Also, I've heard that for Wimax, the higher your floor is, the better. Does this apply to Wifi?

radio waves suffer from an umbrella effect they spread out from the transmitter in all directions (or in one direction with a directional antenna) and fall towards the ground as they travel...i think it's got something to do with the magnetism of the earth...but don't quote me on that....so if your antenna is higher up...it will have more time to travel before hitting the ground and being disrupted


b) The maximum connectivity speed for Wireless G(even if the router is less than 1m to 8m away) is about 60% to 80%, right?? Though I've been reading up on wireless, I'm still not sure what else affects connectivity other than distance and interference like walls, floors and doors. I've heard about terms like throughput, hi-gain and bi-directional antenna affecting connectivity but they're still a bit foreign to me.

i can't answer most of this...cuz i don't know for sure either...but

radio waves are a line of sight transmission....so anything in the way of the reciever and transmitter will cause issues...this could be humidity, walls, people, bugs, who knows what

throughput is the amount of information that can be sent through the connection ina given period of time...you'll see it written as kbps (kilobits per second) or mbps (megabits per second) or (if you're lucky) gbps (gigabits per second) which is a measure of how many bits of information can be transmitted in a second

a high gain antenna is one that will amplify the signal from the device as it travels through the antenna....there's alot of crazy math that i don't understand involved here...but basically the dimensions of your antenna control the amplitude and frequency of your signal...so with the right antenna you can basically pump up the volume on the signal

bidirectional means that the antenna will send out the signal in two directions....most devices ship with an omnidirectional whip antenna that sends the signal out in all directions....which means that you get a pretty good amount of coverage from a central location....however....you lose range because the antenna is having to send out the waves in all directions...and some of that energy get's wasted (say you never sit on that side of the house...so why send waves there)...a directional antenna will send the waves out (in a rough cone shape) in one direction only...so that you can aim your antenna to where you most want connectivity...and thereby increase the range from the device...since all the energy is focused in one direction....a bidirectional antenna sends the waves out in two directions...does the same as a regular directional antenna but it sends the info out in a bipolar fashion (signal comes out of two sides of the antenna instead of just one)


of course...some or all of this info could be wrong...but this is what i've learned from various sources (most of whom i trust)
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