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Intel Centrino Duo Exchange


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#1
ShadowPhoenix

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I was thinking of upgrading the processor in my Toshiba Satellite R20 tablet PC, but I wasn't sure what new Intel processor replaces this one. I just want to be sure that I don't brick my laptop.
It's an Intel Mobile 945GM Chipset. The core type is a T2300, Centrino Duo.
It currently runs at 1.66GHz, and I was looking to upgrade to something around 2.33GHz if possible.

Or, how do you go about (safely) overclocking this processor?

[EDIT] It's been answered. Thanks to James and soxrok for the comments.

Edited by ShadowPhoenix, 26 August 2007 - 01:38 AM.

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#2
james_8970

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Laptop's are in the most part unupgradeable, you can change the RAM, hard drive and screen (if it breaks, of course you can't change it to a larger or smaller size). Some laptop's still actually have their processors soldered into the motherboard making the upgrade impossible. While this may or may not be the case for your laptop/notebook changing the processor will change the heat output thus making the laptop hotter. Now lays your problem, your laptop was specifically designed to cool your laptop for the hardware that it was sold with, thus adding new hardware with greater heat output will result in overheating and possible crashes and/or breaking your computer.
Same thing applies to overclocking laptops, they aren't designed to cool any more then they need to, simply because the laptop manufactures don't want to make it larger (better cooling generally translates into larger materials) and louder.
In short, I highly recommend against any processor upgrades and strongly recommend you don't overclock your laptop.
James

Edited by james_8970, 26 August 2007 - 04:45 PM.

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#3
Hemal

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agreed strongly with james- never overclock your lappy as the hardware they put in those laptops are bare minimal of what you really need to skid by...if your lookin to upgrade your machine, its better to buy something new with the parts in it
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#4
ShadowPhoenix

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Ah, ok. I wasn't sure about how the laptop upgrades went, other than the RAM. Thanks for the info.
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