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#16
james_8970

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You don't have to have a ratio they can work independent. Well at least my mother allows that. Also I don't understand why the total comes to $2000, you could build a super computer with that. You're wasting money on unnessesary things when you can be spending more on the important stuff.

Soorena

Different currencies and country will have varying prices. Remember not everyone is from North America :whistling:
This topic has now treaded very far off topic. I'm sure you have a ratio somewhere and it's selected on "auto" on your board, because the only way to achieve different memory speeds is by a multiplier such as the one we all have located on our CPU.
James

Edited by james_8970, 30 August 2007 - 11:43 PM.

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#17
Troy

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Well at least my mother allows that

It's nice that mummy lets you play... :whistling:

(I assume you meant motherboard?)
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#18
troppo

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Thats $2000 australian not american there is a big difference :whistling:

the only reason i asked about the 1:1 ratio was because i would be runnning the CPU at its 1333Mhz FSB speed whilst having installed DDR3 PC 10600
(1333Mhz) RAM thus giving me a ratio of 1:1

I am not turning my FSB speed down in anyway If anything its going up after some overclocking but i had another thought

even if i did buy the Q6600 with an fsb speed of 1066 Mhz then when i overclock it i would have a 2.8Ghz CPU with an FSB at 1400 Mhz giving me a better memeory overclock anyway which would be the same 1400Mhz giving me the 1:1 ratio.

so basically after purchasing the Q6600 and overclocking to 2.8Ghz i would get the same FSB as the E6750 but with a higher clock speed and another 2 cores


Do you guys think thats the best option for the price???

Thanks for all of your input,
Troppo
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#19
SOORENA

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Well at least my mother allows that

It's nice that mummy lets you play... :whistling:

(I assume you meant motherboard?)


LOL! Sorry I had a late match, again, and I was really tired, then again I don't think my mom knows what overclocking is either, lol. Anyways I don't know if this is for everyone but my Mobo has an option in the page where you set FSBs and you can choose three things:

Auto
Linked
Unlinked

HERE is a page with some screenshots of the BIOS.

Soorena
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#20
Troy

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Yeah my old Asus P5S800-VM (read: crappy) has an option for my RAM, I can leave it on Auto (default) or I can select the speed, and it's weird because it just doesn't work on any setting other than manually forcing it to 400MHz (which is what my ram is - DDR). Also I can select a % to overclock the processor, it has 5%, 10%, 20%, and 30%. I have tried getting it running on the 5% option, but the whole system just goes very unstable. It's just not a good motherboard for it. My temps are like low-mid 30s, so it's not overheating unstable, just weird... BIOS is fun fun fun, I can't wait to get a nice fancy motherboard and have some cool overclock options. It probably won't be for a few years now that my son is born, he's going to eat all our finances up, I just know it... But I love helping out and finding good components online and in real life...
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#21
james_8970

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Well at least my mother allows that

It's nice that mummy lets you play... :blink:

(I assume you meant motherboard?)


LOL! Sorry I had a late match, again, and I was really tired, then again I don't think my mom knows what overclocking is either, lol. Anyways I don't know if this is for everyone but my Mobo has an option in the page where you set FSBs and you can choose three things:

Auto
Linked
Unlinked

HERE is a page with some screenshots of the BIOS.

Soorena

Huh, thats interesting I wonder how that works.... time for some more reading. Good to know for future reference :whistling:

even if i did buy the Q6600 with an fsb speed of 1066 Mhz then when i overclock it i would have a 2.8Ghz CPU with an FSB at 1400 Mhz giving me a better memeory overclock anyway which would be the same 1400Mhz giving me the 1:1 ratio.

Just a heads up, at a FSB of 1400MHz and a ratio of 1:1 would give a memory timing of 700MHz not 1400MHz. Remember the FSB has 4 tiks per clock cycle while DDR2 RAM only has 2 tisk per clock cycle.

James

Edited by james_8970, 31 August 2007 - 11:20 AM.

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#22
stettybet0

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James, this is a very rare occasion. I believe you are confused! :whistling: You see, the way the FSB:memory clock works, if you set the ratio 1:1, the memory clock (not the memory timings, those are completely different) would have to be equal to the FSB. This is NOT taking into account for the quad-pumping of the FSB or the double data rate of the DDR2. So, with my E6750 and my DDR2-800, it a 1:1 ratio would cause my DDR2-800 to try and perform at DDR2-1333 speeds. Obviously, they cannot do this. What you are thinking of is what my motherboard (680i) calls "sync mode". It is effectively a 2:1 ratio. So, if my FSB was 1600mhz, my memory clock would be 800mhz.

You see, the reason why it doesn't take into account quad-pumping and double data rate is this: For instance, a 1600mhz FSB has an underlying actual speed of 400mhz, but it can send 4 instructions at once. A 800mhz memory clock has an underlying actual speed of 400mhz as well, but it can only send 2 instructions at once. If you think of it like this, you can see that, although they are at the same underlying speed, the FSB would be trying to get 2 more instructions at once than the memory could give it. As you can see, this is not a true 1:1 ratio.

Now, if you keep the 1600mhz FSB (underlying 400mhz, 4 instructions at once), but get memory running at 1600mhz as well, then the memory has an underlying speed of 800mhz (still able to send only 2 instructions at once). But now, since the memory is going twice as fast as the FSB, it can send instructions twice as fast. So, to the FSB, it is like the memory is able to send 4 instructions at once. This is a true 1:1 ratio.

Also, like soorena said, my mobo also has an "unlinked" option, in which there is no set ratio between the FSB and the memory clock.

Hopefully that cleared some things up for everyone.
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#23
james_8970

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I see where your coming from, some may not consider it a true 1:1 ratio however many still do (speedfan uses the same terminology as me), there could easily have been confusion created once DDR2 and DDR3 entered the battle ground as they do 2 and 3 calculations per clock cycle as well as the Intel bus now doing a total of 4 calculations per clock cycle.
However the reason why I as well as many of people continue to use the 1:1 reference and theoretically still considered 1:1 ratio is because we use the theoretical values. 800MHz DDR2 memory is theoretically running at 400MHz, like so the 1066MHz or 1333MHz FSB is only running at 266 or 333MHz.
Therefore when DDR2 memory is running at 800MHz and the FSB running at 1600MHz both of these components really are running at a true 1:1 ratio because both of which are running at a theoretical value of 400MHz respectively. So if both theoretical values are the equivalent the ratio becomes 1:1, remember in BIOS we use 266MHz not 1066MHz.
Also as a note here, based on personal preference as well as articles I have read which suggest tighter timings are better, I shoot for tighter timings opposed to higher frequencies on my RAM.
James

Edited by james_8970, 31 August 2007 - 12:50 PM.

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#24
stettybet0

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Like I said before, you have to forget about the underlying clocks when talking about ratios. The final, actual speed is all that matters. I don't really have anything to add that I didn't say in my last post, so re-read that if you still don't understand what I'm saying. Also, I'm basing what I'm saying off of how my mobo (evga 680i A1) interprets things. If I set my ratio to 1:1, it will make my FSB and memory clock be equal (NOT underlying speeds, the actual speeds).

Also, a few other things:

DDR3 will not do 3 instructions at once, it will still only do 2 instructions at once. DDR, DDR2, and DDR3 all only do 2 instructions at once. DDR stands for double data rate. The following numbers only are meant to show that they are a new generation of DDR.

As for whether higher clocks or lower timings is better on memory: It depends. If you can run your memory at 800mhz and 4-4-4-12 timings, or 1066mhz and 5-5-5-16 timings, the later will win in benchmarks. However, if you can only have 800mhz and 4-4-4-12 timings, or 900mhz and 5-5-5-16 timings, then the benchmark scores will be a lot closer. It all depends on how overclockable your RAM is, really.
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#25
james_8970

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DDR3 will not do 3 instructions at once, it will still only do 2 instructions at once. DDR, DDR2, and DDR3 all only do 2 instructions at once. DDR stands for double data rate. The following numbers only are :wacko:meant to show that they are a new generation of DDR.

Yup, goofed here :blink:

As for whether higher clocks or lower timings is better on memory: It depends. If you can run your memory at 800mhz and 4-4-4-12 timings, or 1066mhz and 5-5-5-16 timings, the later will win in benchmarks. However, if you can only have 800mhz and 4-4-4-12 timings, or 900mhz and 5-5-5-16 timings, then the benchmark scores will be a lot closer. It all depends on how overclockable your RAM is, really.

Couldn't agree more.


I'm still unsure about the ratio as I think it has everything to do about the underlying clocks. :whistling:
I'm looking at speed fan and it's confirming my findings....Considering the "unlink" option in the 680i I won't be surprised if the ratios work differently all together on that particular chipset.
James
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#26
troppo

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ok so anyway...Enough about the 1:1 ratio

What would be the better buy here

the Q6600 for $349 with G0 stepping ......or....the Q6600 for $320 with the B3 stepping? The G0 is better isnt it???

and what graphics card should i get thats DX9 thats in the mid range so i can upgrade later???
Im sougt of thinking of another 7600GT what do you think???


Troppo
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#27
james_8970

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What's your budget for the DX9 card, the G0 stepping is better, but your only look at about another 100MHz or less of a overclock. Nothing more.
Your call on whether or not its worth it.
James
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#28
troppo

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Why only another 100Mhz??? i have read reviews that say they have got it up to 3.4 Ghz thats i fair bit

my budget is about 250-300 Au which isnt much but it saves me the money until i can upgrade later on


Thanks,
Troppo
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#29
stettybet0

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Sorry for taking your thread so far offtopic troppo...

Anyways, back on topic:

The G0 stepping is also better since it uses less energy and runs cooler.

Also, if your budget is only 250-300 Au, how do you plan on buying this system which costs around 2000 Au?
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#30
james_8970

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I was referring to the overclocking difference between the G0 and B3 stepping, it's only around 100MHz, if that. I've seen the Q6600 reach 4.1GHz and higher, it's a good overclocking chip if you can keep it cool, just like very other Core2duo.
Budget for the processor :whistling:
James

Edited by james_8970, 31 August 2007 - 08:35 PM.

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