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AMD 6000+ Disappointment


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#1
JoJoTime

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I recently bought the 6000+ X2 yesterday and got it installed this morning. I upgraded from a 3800+ Single and I can't really find much difference! I've seen lots of people's comments saying there is a dramatic increase etc.1
It feels the same as the 3800+!

Can someone please explain what's happening?

My specs are:

Amd athlon 6000+ AM2

ASROCK AM2NF6G-VSTA

2 x 1gb Corsair 667mhz

PALIT 7900GS 512mb

Codegen 650 W (Bought Yesterday as well)
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#2
Troy

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Hi JoJoTime. What have you done to test it out?
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#3
JoJoTime

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Well I've just compared what my rig used to play like with the 3800+. No 'actual' testing.
I can't really multi task and it just feels 'not like the 6000+'.

BTW - Thanks for quick reply.

Edited by JoJoTime, 29 September 2007 - 11:08 PM.

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#4
james_8970

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Simply put, unless you use more then browsers and typical office applications you won't notice a difference.
If you play games, encode video, edit video, edit pictures etc. you will notice a difference because the operations will be completed in less time or in the case of a game you'll get more frames per second.
James
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#5
Neil Jones

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Going from a 3800 single core to a dual-core processor will be noticeable if you do stuff that actually uses the new technology.

Internet browsing, typing letters and generally day to day stuff won't improve, although you may notice a faster start-up of those programs and the system in general.

Ideally you need something intensive like a game or video editing or something heavy like that to really appreciate it.

If your old computer is up and running, download a benchmarking tool like 3DMark, run it on the old system, see what scores you get. Then run it on your new system and see what scores you get.
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#6
Titan8990

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If you check on Tom's Hardware's CPU charts here: http://www23.tomshar...m...1&chart=422. It shows that the newer a game that you play the more of a difference you will notice. They only show the X2 6000+ as being 8 FPS faster than the 3800+ on Unreal Tourney 04, but on a new game such as Quake 4 the difference they clocked was around 40 FPS.

The new games you choose to play the more you should notice. From the 3800+ to the X2 6000+ is quite a step up.
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#7
james_8970

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The new games you choose to play the more you should notice.

I keep hearing this one the forms over and over again, I want to clear something up. Just because a game is new does not mean that it will perform better on a newer processor. The main thing that will cause large differences is multithreaded applications and that will only be on newer up coming games, however remember that there will still be games coming out which are not multithreaded. Just because a game is newer, doesn't nessiarily mean that it will perform better on a newer processor. It has nothing to do with the game unless it's multithreaded.
As for the gap between the two processors on Quake 4, I have no idea what the THG timedemo is, so take that large performance gap with a grain of salt.
James

Edited by james_8970, 30 September 2007 - 01:13 PM.

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#8
Titan8990

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What I stated was an observation of the CPU charts. I was aware that multithreading had not made its way around to games or really any applications for that matter. I didn't mean to cause confusion.

As for the gap between the two processors on Quake 4, I have no idea what the THG timedemo is, so take that large performance gap with a grain of salt.


Sorry, but I don't understand this saying.

Edited by Titan8990, 30 September 2007 - 01:01 PM.

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#9
james_8970

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I just trying to clear this up. Like a E4400 is newer then an E6600, which is faster? The E6600 of course, hand down.
Now that I reread you post you not saying what others have been saying recently, agreed as newer games become more demanding you'll begin to notice the difference between these two procesors. Sorry about this mix up.

I'm not sure what I was saying there either, I'd ignore it :)
Pay close attention to the processors though, if (s)he had a 3800+ code name "Orleans" then the difference is as small as 8.3 FPS on quake 4
James

Edited by james_8970, 30 September 2007 - 01:14 PM.

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#10
SOORENA

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If you have not re-installed Windows you will not see much of a difference. Also make sure that you install the drivers in order once you reformat. Chipset should always be first. My E6600 seems to run apps the same as my old Celeron right now because I'm loading too much apps on it and I haven't had time to re-install Windows

Soorena

Edited by SOORENA, 30 September 2007 - 05:02 PM.

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#11
JoJoTime

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Thankyou all for solving my problem :)
Long Live GeeksToGo! Hurrayy
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#12
Troy

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Glad we could help! As another example, I recently helped my friend build a new Core 2 Duo "monster", it was a pretty sweet build. He wanted XP on it, and so we could pretty much directly compare my P4 system with his. As you have said, it felt about the same, but once we started running some benchmarks, his just pulled away and left me to eat power-supply-exhaust-fumes... And of course, once we played some games, he was getting much better FPS etc... So it really depends what you do with your computer.

Cheers :)
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