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How to use BootVis With window Xp?


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#1
wen9x88

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How to use BootVis With window Xp?
i downloaded and installed this software but i don't know how to use it.
can anyone tell me step by step?
thx
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#2
latigid

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I would advice not using bootvis.
It messed up my computer and also is no longer supported by Microsoft.

http://www.microsoft...ot/bootvis.mspx
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#3
Neil Jones

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BootVis uses technology built into Windows XP already and is already run as part of normal system startup every once in a while.
There is no need to run it manually, it won't hurt anything if you do, but its not a necessary tool.
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#4
1101doc

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Bootvis was designed by Microsoft as a tool for use by computer manufacturers to assure proper configuration for Windows. It has many tools for examining all sorts of hardware and software influences on boot processes, only one of which is of any use to the ordinary user, and that optimizes the boot files for fastest access by the system during the boot process.

To order the boot files on the disc, Bootvis uses a native XP process to initiate the built-in defragmenter which moves files as required to properly order them in sequence called by the system during boot.

XP is designed to perform this procedure about every 3 days after the system has been idle for about 15-20 min. Since many users never let their system idle for long enough to initiate "Idle Tasks," they report that Bootvis has improved boot time. Well yes, it has, but only by activating a native XP process.

To initiate Idle Tasks, and gain the same effect as bootvis could provide, simply make a new shortcut, and in the box where asked to "Type location..." paste this:

%windir%\system32\Rundll32.exe advapi32.dll,ProcessIdleTasks

I instinctively leave Windows alone for about 10-15 min while it its working, but I do not know that it is required to do so. Since I rarely let my system idle, I run the shortcut about every 3rd day, just as Windows would do if left idle long enough.

If you regularly leave your system idle for considerable periods, neither the Idle Tasks nor bootvis will make a difference to your boot time. Your boot files are already optimized.

Since bootvis is not actually required for the computer user, I suggest that you un-install it and rely on Idle Tasks for boot optimization. As pointed out in an earlier post, improper use of bootvis can actually have unpleasant consequences.

In addition, it should be mentioned that Idle Tasks cannot do much, if anything, for the time it takes to load your personal start-up applications. Those are up to you.
I have found nothing more user-friendly than WinPatrol for this purpose: http://www.winpatrol.com/
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