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Linux install


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#1
Luckyjfl

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Hi, I do hope this has not beem already dealt with. I have had winxp for so long now, I have forgotten when I got it. But I would love to try Linux. I know there are quite a few to choose from, Ie, Fedora, Ubuntu,Linspire, and pclinuxos to name but a few. Would it be better to install it on a seperate HD , rather then Partition the Primary one. Also, does the 2nd HD need to be formatted, leaving it ext3. Not too sure what that means as yet. If the 2nd HD has NTFS system on it, will the Linux still be able to install.
I hope you can help a Linux Noob out here. thankyou
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#2
silverbeard

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HI Luckyjfl,

Having a second hard drive will make the install easier. No Linux doesn't install well on NTFS. You will need to format to a Linux file system. I've used ext3 so long it's just the one I choose but there are quite a few to choose from.

I find pre-partitioning the drive makes the install go smoother plus I like certain sizes for root partitons (10 to 20 gigs).

Most of todays distros have pretty good installers and can do it all for you if you don't fell comfortable setting it up yourself. Just read the instructions in the installer carefully and understand that drive indentification in Linux is different from Windows. (example: hd0 and hd1 in Windows will be hda and hdb in Linux and then numbered according to the number of partitions).

While you can install on one patition it is not advisable. It is recommended that you used at least three partitions. One for root (/), one for home (/home) and a swap partition.
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#3
Luckyjfl

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Hi Silverbeard, sorry for the delay in replying. And thank you for the help, ok. I was waiting to see if the install went ok. As it happens it installed quite nicely. That is, Ubuntu. I have one problem which I need to get sorted asap. Whatever I did I am having all mt typed notes or log ins that I type, Encrypted. So, if I am using Ububtu, I cannot log in anywhere as it changes my typing. I do not know what I have done wrong here. Any ideas.

Cheers.

Lucky
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#4
Luckyjfl

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Problem solved. I managed to fix that problem. Ubuntu is running ok at the moment. I have decided to also try " Simply Mepis Linux system. It seemed to give me the same alternatives as Ubuntu when it was instaling. Very easy to install also.
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#5
silverbeard

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I've used SimplyMepis for years now and have found it to be my favorite. It just works and has maintained a solid distro through several changes of cores. I don't think my 6.0.4 install is going anywhere for awhile as it has the ubuntu 6.06 core and is still maintained. I have been completely impressed with the 7.0 betas. The wireless on my laptop(Broadcom) worked right out of the box. The Debian Etch core should make it another long time keeper. Give it a good test drive and don't get intimidated by the wide range of choices KDE gives you compared to GNOME. The freedom is intoxicating. ;-)
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#6
Luckyjfl

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Thanks for that Silverbeard, I will definitly give it a good go. By the way, if I decided to install the full SimplyMepis on that slave which Ubuntu is on. How would I go about getting rid of those bootup sequences in the bios, related to Ubuntu.
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#7
silverbeard

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Mepis will install GRUB with the settings you need. It should overwrite the bootloader Ubuntu installed. I use SimplyMepis live CDs to repair GRUB when I hose the boot sector playing with other distros. It always seems to find the installed systems and I rarely have to manually edit the menu.lst to make things go again.
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#8
Luckyjfl

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Would this make a difference as I have actually installed the full version of Ubuntu on that HD. What was on my mind was, how to take Ubuntu off all together. I don't know how to this because I am still learning about Linux.

Cheers
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#9
silverbeard

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The beauty of any OS(including Windows) is if you format the drive the files are not an issue. Just be prepared to install your new system or you'll have to repair the Windows boot from repair console. Format the home partition to if you're planing on using the same user name, some of the config files may not play well with a different system.
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#10
Luckyjfl

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Thanks Silverbeard.
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