Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Constantly Dropping Signals


  • Please log in to reply

#1
mrdrphil007

mrdrphil007

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 87 posts
Ok, I have a PC upstairs that connects to the network via WiFi with a Linksys wireless card. After my Linksys router went out, I got a Dlink.

After about an hour, the upstairs PC will drop the wireless signal and it takes a restart of the PC to reconnect. At best, I only receive a 60% signal strength and the PC is probably 30 feet away through 3 walls.

Why does it drop signals so frequently and what can I do to fix it?

I am A+ certified and know a lot about PCs, but I'm not so knowledgeable about wireless.
  • 0

Advertisements


#2
pip22

pip22

    Trusted Tech

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,663 posts
Not all wireless routers are made equal. Some have a wider signal range than others, usually reflected in the price. Those with a greater range will often have two or three antennas compared to the single one of a 'standard range' router. Your old Linksys router may have been a wide-range model whereas the new DLink one may only be standard range.

Also, if you buy a wide-range router you need to also get a wide-range wireless card to use with the remote PC otherwise you will get poor performance like you are currently experiencing.
  • 0

#3
mrdrphil007

mrdrphil007

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 87 posts

Not all wireless routers are made equal. Some have a wider signal range than others, usually reflected in the price. Those with a greater range will often have two or three antennas compared to the single one of a 'standard range' router. Your old Linksys router may have been a wide-range model whereas the new DLink one may only be standard range.

Also, if you buy a wide-range router you need to also get a wide-range wireless card to use with the remote PC otherwise you will get poor performance like you are currently experiencing.


Would it really be that bad in a space of about 30 feet and 3 walls?

Oh well. We're just going to run an Ethernet cable around the house. I admit defeat.
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP