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I need to find Power Supply Fan for old Computer


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#1
Waynesworld

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I have a power supply fan going out on me and need to replace it.

It is an older machine but does what it is used for.

It is an etower 366i2.

Where can I find one?

What do you need to know to help me find one?

Here is some info I found on the emachine website; Power Supply: PS ILSAN ISP-120S, 120Watts

Any help would be most appreciated.

Thanks
Waynesworld
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#2
Neil Jones

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If it was a standard size power supply unit (which it isn't, common eMachines trick this with the older models) it would be just a case of swapping it out.

Please don't take your power supply unit apart, you could potentially electrocute yourself - capacitors hold charge for a very long time.
Far safer just to replace the entire unit - http://www.affordabl...ower_supply.asp might be of interest to you :)
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#3
Waynesworld

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I want to thank you for your input but I really dont want to put close to 50 dollars in this old computer. I really would rather find a replacement fan for this. I feel comfortable going into the power supply to replace the fan.

Please help me find a replacement fan.

Thanks
Waynesworld
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#4
Dave Kruger

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As Neil Jones had mentioned, you are not likely to be able to just replace the power supply fan, you potentially could injure yourself by doing so. However, that said, you pretty much would have to look at the size, voltage, and current of the existing fan and set out searching for a replacement. The problem is that virtually every power supply I have seen and taken apart, the fan wires on the power supply are soldered on to the board. You would have two options if you manage to find a fan from a local computer retailer etc, unsolder the old fan connections, and solder in the new, or clip the wires for the old fan and use some wire nuts to rig in the replacement fan. I would recommend replacing the entire power supply however, due to time to replace the fan versus swapping out the new power supply and to prevent the chance of bodily injury, $50 is not much.
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#5
Troy

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Also you may want to consider if you even need the fan - will the PSU continue to work without it? Just leave it be and add a separate fan nearby that will help cool the unit.
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#6
james_8970

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Also you may want to consider if you even need the fan - will the PSU continue to work without it? Just leave it be and add a separate fan nearby that will help cool the unit.

Please DON'T do this.


The risk of death or severe injury is not worth the little you will save to buy a new unit.
James
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#7
Neil Jones

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Please don't run a PSU without a fan inside it, its what keeps it cool in the first place because it pulls hot air out of the unit (and draws through hot air that naturally rises from the other components) and out the back. You'll only cut its lifespan by about 95% and be lucky if it lasts the rest of the month.

An alternate solution would be to recase the eMachines. That''ll give you a brand new standard size power supply that will work on your computer as well as a nice shiny new case. Basically a recase is putting all the eMachine bits into a new computer case and connecting everything up. Plus when the machine does finally die in a few years time, you can use the case again.
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#8
zorba the geek

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[attachment=16514:52.jpg]troy,is that what you had in mind?
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#9
james_8970

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[attachment=16514:52.jpg]troy,is that what you had in mind?

Sadly, I doubt that'd even be enough to keep the PSU cool (if the PSU fan wasn't working).
James

Edited by james_8970, 10 November 2007 - 06:05 PM.

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#10
Troy

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Okay, here's what I actually meant, I should have explained it further: Placing a fan on the outside of the unit, but in the same position to achieve the same effect as the internal one. I have drawn a picture and attached it below. I did not mean to go without a fan entirely. This is just a thought I had that may be possible, and if it gets setup right, I don't see why it shouldn't work, all else being equal.

Nonetheless, it may be best not to even try it :)

P.S. Nice picture, Zorba :)
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#11
james_8970

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I wouldn't suggest doing that, the fan wouldn't be properly placed above the heatsinks for the capacitors, which would translate into inadequate cooling.
It's not worth fooling around with it, because if your PSU goes, you could potentially lose your computer with it.
James
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#12
Troy

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I have to admit, I think I like the option Neil Jones gave the best - grab a new case, and a standard-size PSU to go with it :)
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#13
Waynesworld

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Please don't run a PSU without a fan inside it, its what keeps it cool in the first place because it pulls hot air out of the unit (and draws through hot air that naturally rises from the other components) and out the back. You'll only cut its lifespan by about 95% and be lucky if it lasts the rest of the month.

An alternate solution would be to recase the eMachines. That''ll give you a brand new standard size power supply that will work on your computer as well as a nice shiny new case. Basically a recase is putting all the eMachine bits into a new computer case and connecting everything up. Plus when the machine does finally die in a few years time, you can use the case again.


Can you give me a link to a case and power supply that you would consider?

Thanks
Waynesworld
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#14
Neil Jones

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All ATX cases are standard size, those that come with Power Supply Units, those PSUs will be standard size.
If you want, you can get Mini cases which support Micro-ATX motherboards (which is the size the industry seems to be moving towards and is the size in most branded computers, especially eMachines).
It's all down to what colour, style and general "look" you want. Pointless me recommending a case because if I find something I like, you'll probably think its ugly.
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#15
james_8970

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As far as the case goes, I'd have to agree with Neil Jones.
If you want additional suggestions on a PSU, please give us a budget and we'd be happy to help.
Also, please don't buy a PSU/case combo, those PSU's are among the worst of all PSU's.
James
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