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Very high-end tech question


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#1
Vaillant

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This is probably a longshot, but I'll ask anyway. Any imput from someone who knows what im talking about will be appreciated!

So here's the situation: I'm working on making myself a standard XP image for my home PC's via sysprep that I apply on an image that I created and installed all my apps on a VMware.

The VMware is my "master computer" as microsoft often refer to it. all my configurations and settings, sofwares, etc. are done on the VMware image. I've created a sysprep.inf answer file with automations to make the image portable with sysprep. I built the sysprepmasstorage section, pnpoemdrivers section, etc so the image can apply to another computer correctly.

If you're wondering about how I defeated licencing problems, I've got scripts that I found on the internet, and adapted, to change the product key on my windows and other apps.


So, if anyone's still with me, I'll continue. I run sysprep, ghost the virtual computer with acronis true image 9, and create my ghost file. Loads fine on my desktop (INTEL). Unfortunately, I cant load it onto my laptop (AMD).

Now, I know they say you cant do that, take an image and apply to a non-intel proc, but my VMware image was originally created on the AMD laptop to begin with, and else than that, it IS a vmware, portability applies. From what I've read on KB888372, the STOP code I recieve ( the standard one, 0x0000007E (C0000005, bla, bla, bla)) indicates its the problem going to non-intel procs, and its related to an orphaned registry key about the intel processor driver.

My question to you is, I figure if I can locate and disable that registry key, delete it alltogether, while my vmware is running on my laptop, and run sysprep, then ghost it... shouldnt that make it applicable to my laptop?

Your question to Me will be " Well if you delete the intel driver's registry key, how will you load your image onto an intel-based system?" my answer is this: I've already done the swap: prior to making a hardware independent image with VMware, i used sysprep on my laptop's XP and loaded it onto my desktop with success.

So again, any chance I can delete that registry key, and make this work?
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#2
Neil Jones

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Theoretically SysPrep ties itself and the configuration to the machine that the computer was built with.
Ideally you should use the computer itself to create a Ghost image as opposed to a virtual setup like VMWare because basically its not guaranteed to work outside of the setup that it was made with. The physical processor doesn't matter, it doesn't matter if you ghost for AMD and then apply to Pentium. The chipset is more likely to upset it, so if your desktop and your laptop have different chipsets, the image is not transferrable.
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#3
Vaillant

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So then how come we can use a sysprep image to install upon multiple desktop types in the first place? Your explanation does not make much sense to me, sorry, perhaps if you try to clarify?

The chipsets vary with each board, and the point of using sysprep is to make the windows re-detect the PNP hardware on the new computer....
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#4
Vaillant

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Hmm, looks like I figured it out. Found a page out there that explained this error and several ways to disable it. By booting a win-PE disk on my newly imaged laptop, and renaming the intelppm.sys to something else, it cant be loaded by accident and the BSOD never happens.

Thanks anyway, and untill next time, Joe.
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