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#31
OGpmpdog

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Thanks for the info...the links were very informative...I m sure I ll quit my job soon and just do PC tech!!

So, I have some more questions...

I'm thinking of running 1 SATA and 2 IDE HDs for storage...

Do I have to designate my SATA HDs RAID5 as soon as I configure BIOS, prior to installing Vista?

Do I need another SATA HD to configure a RAID5 storage system...if so, does the additional drive have to be the same size as the master SATA HD?

Will there be problems transferring files among drives if my 2 ATA HDs are configured NTFS, and my new SATA HDs are configured RAID5?

Wow, 2 weeks ago, I never would have asked about this stuff.... :)

Edited by OGpmpdog, 16 December 2007 - 04:03 PM.

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#32
Troy

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Okay so you intend on running RAID? I never knew this before... RAID is rather complex to setup and I've personally never done it before. I would love to experiment with it, though :)

I'll PM one of our staff members who I remember has experience with RAID systems, hopefully he can help you further with this.

As far as I know, though, each drive will be configured NTFS, it's just that RAID changes the way the computer uses the drives. And for RAID, I'm pretty sure every drive must be the same.

After looking through the specs once more, I don't believe that motherboard is capable of running a RAID solution. Do you have a RAID add-on card?
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#33
dsenette

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what is your logic behind raid5? also you MUST have a minimum of 5 drives to implement Raid5....
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#34
OGpmpdog

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Whoa...I was just leafing through my BIOS manual and the RAID5 option seemed intriguing...I dont know if my mobo has a RAID add-on card...I assumed that RAID was built into the mobo...

Sorry to complicate things...I just want to ensure that all 3 of my HD's can transfer files among each other...This is my biggest concern...all I have to do is keep the NTFS format for all HDs?
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#35
dsenette

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if all you care about is using the HD's...then forget about RAID (any level)...in my experience it's more hassle than it's worth on a home computer....as long as you've got enough places to plug in all your drives...and they're functional...you'll have no issues...you can have as many as the machine can hold and it will work fine


RAID stands for Redundant Array of Independant (can also stand for inexpensive) Disks....there are 6 standard levels of raid (though you'll only really hear of 5) those being RAID0, RAID1, RAID3, RAID4, RAID5, and RAID6.

RAID0 is the lowest level of RAID and requires at least 2 disks. it is designed to provide "Striping". Striping is the process of breaking data up into chunks and writing each chunk to a seperate disk in the array which effectively increases your immediate storage size. so if you write a 10MB file to a RAID0 array of 10 disks each disk would get 1MB of the complete file (these numbers are made up....the actuall block size depends on configuration of the array). while RAID0 can improve storage speed and percieved storage size...it offers no redundancy...if one drive in the array dies then you lose the entire array because the files on the array are split up between the drives and cannot be rebuilt once one block is lost

RAID1 is the second lowest level of RAID and requires at least 2 disks. it is designed to provide "mirroring". Mirroring is the process of writing the same data to all disks in the array simultaneously. with RAID1 you effectively cut your total storage size (the combined size of both drives) in half because the array is seen as one drive since the data will be written to both drives at the same time. the only purpose for RAID1 is to provide fault tollerance. if one drive in the array dies then you don't lose your data since it was written to both drives.

RAID3 is third and requires at least 3 disks. it is designed to offer striping and "dedicated parity". Striping in this instance is the same as the striping used in RAID0 where the data is broken into chunks and writted to each disk in the array EXCEPT for the last disk in the array, the last disk in the array is for "dedicated parity". Parity in this instance is basically a block of information that can be used to rebuild the information on any of the stripes in the array if one of the disks fails. so in a 3 disk RAID3 array all data will be broken up across two of the disks in stripes and the parity information will be written to the 3rd disk. if disk 2 fails then you can replace that drive and the RAID array will use the information on disk1 and the parity info on disk3 to rebuild disk2's striped information. however with this level you have a bottle neck because every write cycle must not only write to the two striped disks but you must also write to the parity disk. also if the parity drive fails then your array is broken untill the parity can be rebuilt during which time any other drive failure will be catastrophic

RAID4 is basically the same as RAID3 except that it does block level striping instead of byte level striping (look that up it's not worth explaining)

RAID5 is the next level and it requires at least 3 drives. it provides striping with distributed parity. same striping as the other levels and a similar parity as RAID3 except that instead of having a single drive for the parity information it's placed on each drive in a sequence (i.e. drive one get's the first parity info then drive two then drive three etc..). this provides even more redundancy in the array. any single drive in the array can fail and you will not lose your data because the parity information exists on other drives. however this level is still vulnerable to failure if two drives fail at once or if a second drives before the third was in the array was rebuilt

RAID6 is the last level and it requires at least 3 drives. it's basically the same as RAID5 except that it provides striping with dual distributed parity. this means that the parity information is written on two seperate disks at a time and this parity rotates through the array . this gives the array the ability to recover from 2 drive failures since the parity exists on more than one drive at a time.

i don't think you'll need raid at all...i think your best bet would be to use your three drives on their own...use one drive for maybe the OS and applications, one drive for data only, and then the third drive could be used for regularly scheduled backups of the entire system
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#36
Troy

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i don't think you'll need raid at all...i think your best bet would be to use your three drives on their own...use one drive for maybe the OS and applications, one drive for data only, and then the third drive could be used for regularly scheduled backups of the entire system

Sounds good to me, I would agree with this. Use your SATA hard drive for the OS and applications :)
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#37
OGpmpdog

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Dsenette & Troy:

Thanks for the encyclopedia of information...I might printout that RAID lesson and put it in on my wall...

Further research compels me to keep it simple...Besides, I m still waiting on a PSU to birth my new PC! :)

I suppose I'll concentrate on the BIOS and OS configuration now, minus RAID concerns. I'll keep you informed.

You guys are awesome...This site, by far, is the friendliest and most informative for us wannabe PC geeks. Thanks for holding my hands throughout the process.

Happy Holidays!
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#38
OGpmpdog

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i don't think you'll need raid at all...i think your best bet would be to use your three drives on their own...use one drive for maybe the OS and applications, one drive for data only, and then the third drive could be used for regularly scheduled backups of the entire system

Sounds good to me, I would agree with this. Use your SATA hard drive for the OS and applications :)


What about the other 200+ GB?? :)
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#39
Troy

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That goes on the second drive for data
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#40
OGpmpdog

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*UPDATE*

Happy Holidays to all!

Got new PSU and system is up and running!

My old HDs were recognized and life is good.

Thanks to all who helped me build new PC!

So far, I have to say that I prefer XP over Vista...Vista is too intrusive and it's been tedious to configure a firewall.

I m using Comodo as firewall but system has slowed to a snail crawl...I m thinkin of going back to zonealarm.

Are there any special settings that I need to tweak in Comodo for my system to run faster? right now, the delay is so bad that I cant even surf the net!!

What is the best and EASIEST FREE firewall to use?

Also, Vista virtually compels you to get a graphics card. Can someone recommend a card that supports that Vista "3d Draw"? I dont see myself spending 300 bucks on a video card.

Would I hurt my system if i disabled that irritating Windows defender program?

Thanks folks.
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#41
Troy

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:) Glad to hear your system is running well :)

It took me 3 days, and now I can't stand XP :) Personally I don't even use a third-party firewall, the in-built Vista one is good enough for now. I actually made a topic on this, one of the malware staff members recommended it. Here is the link - you'll want to scroll down toward the bottom in particular.

If you like, you could also start a new topic in the Vista section asking for help with these questions, you'd probably get a better response there.

And for a graphics card, something like this is cheap, quiet, and would run Aero fine.
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#42
OGpmpdog

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OK, It is taking FOREVER to download and install Vista updates...and I dont know what's slowing down the system...but, I ll worry about that later.

Anyway, I just discovered that my front ports (USBs, Headphones, Mic) dont work!! :)

I checked Device Manager and system recognizes the ports!! :)

I switched the JUS1 and JUS2 wiring on the mobo and nothing changed. Now what?

HELP!!!

Thanks.
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