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Liquid Nitrogen Cooling


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#1
georgewashington16

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I was interested in overclocking a couple of video cards I may get to extreme amounts so I don't have to buy an 8800gt. For this however, I believe I may need some sort of Liquid Nitrogen cooling and a few extra case fans.(If any cases support Nitrogen Cooling) Does anyone know how much liquid nitrogen cooling goes for and what things I may need. My goal is to play Crysis maxed out at 1280*1024 with two 8600gt xxx in sli mode.

Edited by georgewashington16, 01 January 2008 - 03:10 PM.

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#2
hfcg

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Liquid nitrogen boils at −196 °C (−321 °F), and is a cryogenic fluid which is potentially capable of causing rapid frostbite on contact with living tissue. When appropriately insulated from ambient heat, liquid nitrogen can be stored and transported, for example in vacuum flasks. Here, the very low temperature is held constant at -196 °C by slow boiling of the liquid, resulting in the evolution of nitrogen gas. Depending on the size and design the holding time of vacuum flasks ranges from a few hours to a few weeks.

Hello, and welcome to Geeks To Go. The extream low temputures of liquid nitroger make your suggeston impossable as your computer woul not work at such low temputures. try looking for a good liquid cooler.
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#3
pyrocajun2707

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Liquid Nitrogen cooling does exist, but is only in the experimental stages as of now. Even still, lN2 cooling is and will remain far too difficult to maintain, as the level of nitrogen in the evaporation chamber must remain constant. Too little N2 will cook your CPU and too much will cause the wires and transistors within the die to shatter from the temperature differential when the chip goes under a sudden heavy load.

If you're looking into a cooling system this high-performance, go with a phase change cooling system for your CPU and a high-performance water cooling system for your GPUs and north/south bridge chipsets.

http://www.frozencpu...tml?id=5WYSRc6a

-A good phase change cooling system, accessories, and custom PC case that fits it.

http://www.newegg.co... Cooling System

-A good selection of water cooling systems. I reccommend anything made by Koolance, Cooler Master, Corsair, Zalman or Gigabyte.

You also need to look into RAM coolers if you're going all-out with the overclocking: http://www.newegg.co.......4&name=Fans They work great if your RAM has heatsinks on it. If it doesn't, get new RAM. You NEED overclocking RAM for this. I reccomend anything made by Corsair or OCZ. Corsair is the best, hands-down. All their memory comes with a lifetime warranty. About a year ago, I sent back a stick that I burned out while overclocking and they actually GAVE me a BRAND NEW one.

Good luck with this; I would LOVE to see the finished product. High-performance hardware is kind of my thing.
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