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Potential Power Supply Failure


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#1
waffle11

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Recently I was using my computer for a game of counter strike, when the entire computer suddenly shut down with no sign of an error message and now completely refuses to start. I only assume it is the power supply as the system will not even light up my optical mouse, which is always lit. I was hoping someone would be able to either confirm that the problem lies within the power supply, or another possible solution before I purchase a new psu. If the power supply did in fact die I would also like to know if my other hardware could be in potential danger from the psu dieing.

System Specs:
AMD 64 2800+
1Gb of Kingston RAM (I currently forgot the speed but can find out if necessary)
ATI Radeon 9800 pro 128mb
120Gb Hard Drive
Antec SLK1650B case with intergrated 350W psu.
(I forgot my Mobo but I can figure it out if necessary)

Thanks
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#2
Doby

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Does sound like the psu died, remove it from the computer and plug into the wall outet, on the 20/24 pin connectore touch the green and any black wire with a paper clip, this should turn the psu on if not its dead.

Also understand that this will only test if the psu turns on not that it is producing the proper voltages to run the computer but its a good test to try if the computer shows no signs of life
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#3
waffle11

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I ran your testing method and the psu does appear to be the problem in my system. However, I have no experience in psu's and would like to know what to look for in buying one (brand, wattage, ect.) I would also like to know if there would be any ill effects in buying a psu that has more wattage than for the needed system because I plan to upgrade when I get the money, and it would eliminate one thing I need if possible.

Thanks again.

Edited by waffle11, 03 January 2008 - 08:51 AM.

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#4
pyrocajun2707

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I ran your testing method and the psu does appear to be the problem in my system. However, I have no experience in psu's and would like to know what to look for in buying one (brand, wattage, ect.) I would also like to know if there would be any ill effects in buying a psu that has more wattage than for the needed system because I plan to upgrade when I get the money, and it would eliminate one thing I need if possible.

Thanks again.


All good PSUs have internal regulation systems and induction coils that make it almost impossible to fry your internal components in the event of a PSU failure unless, of course, it is the effect of a large power surge. Your PC should be fine other than the PSU.

Your power supply can never have too much wattage; that's not the way wattage works. Your system will take only what it needs, and the supply will regulate that. The wattage is really more of a measure of what kind of draw your supply can handle. To be safe, a 400 or 450 watt PSU would be good for you, especially if you ever want to upgrade that graphics card of yours.

Here are some good PSUs (Though make sure your PC takes regular ATX PSUs.):

http://www.newegg.co...N82E16817139003 -Good quality

http://www.newegg.co...N82E16817171001 -Nice features

http://www.tigerdire...dy=REVIEWS#tabs -And these babies are just bad@$$.

If you plan to go with a DX10 video card, faster CPU, more hard drives, etc, you will probably want to go with a 600+ watt PSU. Those new GPUs and AMD CPUs pull a lot of juice.
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#5
The Skeptic

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You can't tell at this stage if other components were damaged (hopefully not), nor can you tell the cause of the failure. One thing is obvious: as a first step you must replace the psu. Only then you will be able to see if there is any other damage. If you can "borrow" the psu from another computer, install it temporarilly to the damaged computer. If the computer runs well then a new psu is all you need.

Regarding wattage, this was explained nicely by pyrocajun2707.
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#6
Doby

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I ran your testing method and the psu does appear to be the problem in my system. However, I have no experience in psu's and would like to know what to look for in buying one (brand, wattage, ect.) I would also like to know if there would be any ill effects in buying a psu that has more wattage than for the needed system because I plan to upgrade when I get the money, and it would eliminate one thing I need if possible.

Thanks again.


All good PSUs have internal regulation systems and induction coils that make it almost impossible to fry your internal components in the event of a PSU failure unless, of course, it is the effect of a large power surge. Your PC should be fine other than the PSU.

Your power supply can never have too much wattage; that's not the way wattage works. Your system will take only what it needs, and the supply will regulate that. The wattage is really more of a measure of what kind of draw your supply can handle. To be safe, a 400 or 450 watt PSU would be good for you, especially if you ever want to upgrade that graphics card of yours.

Here are some good PSUs (Though make sure your PC takes regular ATX PSUs.):

http://www.newegg.co...N82E16817139003 -Good quality

http://www.newegg.co...N82E16817171001 -Nice features

http://www.tigerdire...dy=REVIEWS#tabs -And these babies are just bad@$$.

If you plan to go with a DX10 video card, faster CPU, more hard drives, etc, you will probably want to go with a 600+ watt PSU. Those new GPUs and AMD CPUs pull a lot of juice.


Nice post I totaly agree with your selections

I would like to add though if he would get another antec the trio 430 W are great and for future upgrade consider the Antec trio 650W
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#7
waffle11

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Thanks for all the help guys. I will probably just wait on a 600W or anything higher because I am not planning to upgrade for some time. And I did discover that my psu is the standard ATX type. I cant describe how helpful you all have been.
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#8
pyrocajun2707

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Thanks for all the help guys. I will probably just wait on a 600W or anything higher because I am not planning to upgrade for some time. And I did discover that my psu is the standard ATX type. I cant describe how helpful you all have been.


No prob, dude. That's what we're here for! :)
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