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Air cooling for my overclocked e6850


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#16
jhemfl

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That's cool, I probably wont be able to post the picture until tonight anyway.

I'm actually in school right now lol, some lame Microsoft Office Class.


But yea, I'm not neccessarily looking for water cooling, I would like to have it because incase I decide to SLI two gtx's in the future I will absolutly not have room unless I add a water block, and by getting a water cooling system I would be future proofing myself in case I wanted to upgrade. But unless I can find a cheap efficient CPU cooler that will support my overclocking desires, I don't want to spend $200 on something that I might replace in the near future (6months-year).

Edited by jhemfl, 14 January 2008 - 11:00 AM.

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#17
jhemfl

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Ok, I think I've made my decision, tell me if this will work.

I'm going to upgrade my case to a full tower, the coolermaster stacker 830 and I'll install a couple of fans in the fan drive bay. Will that keep my internals cool?
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#18
Troy

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I was thinking maybe theres too much voltage going to the CPU, its currently set at 1.42V. Or maybe its normal for a e6850 to run at these temps.

Hi, this is from your first post, those temperatures are far too high and so is the voltage. You can get really good air-cooling systems for these processors that aren't as expensive as water-cooling. Something like this would be a good choice. You would attach a 120mm fan to it to keep things moving quickly.

As for your voltages, I have an E6750 which I run at 1.3125V stock, I believe both mine and yours (E6850) require 1.35V from Intel's recommendation, but they seem to run very stable at the lower voltage. 1.42V is way too high unless you are extreme overclocking. Even a mild-mid overclock shouldn't see you needing to hit 1.4V at all.

I believe the case change may be a good idea, a lot more room for air-flow and heaps of fans to keep it moving sounds good. Maybe try lowering the voltages first, this may help some.

Troy
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#19
james_8970

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1.42V is way too high unless you are extreme overclocking. Even a mild-mid overclock shouldn't see you needing to hit 1.4V at all.

That CPU could go up to 1.5V for long term use, if your running your system 24/7 don't go any further, if your not, you could go a little further but anything past 1.5V is iffy.

The stacker is a great choice for cooling, in fact I plan on buying either that case of the Antec 1200 in the summer.

Now that I see you're trying to cool two GTX's in the near future, a water cooling setup will cost around $350-400 because you need to get high end radiators (notice the "s") and lots of fans, I have 9 fans for my build.

While the TRUE (thermalright ultra-120 extreme) is indeed better then the Tuniq I suggested, the performance between the two aren't very large. Add the fact that newegg doesn't seem to have any thermalright products in at the moment, the thermalright ultra-120 extreme is 15$ more, doesn't come with a fan controller or fan. I'd suggest the Tuniq over the thermalright ultra-120 extreme, unless you are going to be going at voltages in excess of 1.5V.
http://www.anandtech...d...?i=2943&p=4

James

Edited by james_8970, 15 January 2008 - 08:23 PM.

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#20
jhemfl

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Yea, but I've looked at some of the benchmark tests and air cooling simply isn't anywhere close to water cooling. I could be wrong but I was reading tests, reviews, and comparisons on some of the said to be "top" air coolers, and they keep computers at like 40-50C load. Then, I was reading about water cooling which was said to keep computers between 30-40C load. So maybe a cooling kit that's expandable so I can add tubing where necessary as I buy more add-ons).


I'm just looking for a water cooling kit that is expandable. Also, I kind of mimic'd my comp after my friend's, and just curious power supply sizes are universal right? Or do I need to worry about my current power supply being too big for the 830 stacker?

Edited by jhemfl, 16 January 2008 - 02:45 AM.

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#21
james_8970

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Yea, but I've looked at some of the benchmark tests and air cooling simply isn't anywhere close to water cooling. I could be wrong but I was reading tests, reviews, and comparisons on some of the said to be "top" air coolers, and they keep computers at like 40-50C load. Then, I was reading about water cooling which was said to keep computers between 30-40C load. So maybe a cooling kit that's expandable so I can add tubing where necessary as I buy more add-ons).

It all depends on the quality of the parts your putting into your rig. With my watercooling kit, it brought my temps down ~25*C from the stock cooler. However, if you buy a low end watercooling loop it'll perform on par or worse then high end air cooling.

I'm just looking for a water cooling kit that is expandable. Also, I kind of mimic'd my comp after my friend's, and just curious power supply sizes are universal right? Or do I need to worry about my current power supply being too big for the 830 stacker?

As long as your PSU isn't from a dell, e-machine, etc. yes they are universal.

James

Edit: Just out of curiosity, have you downclocked your CPU from your initial post? As I said in my first post and as troy mentioned again, 50*C is to high for idle temps

Edited by james_8970, 16 January 2008 - 09:50 AM.

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#22
jhemfl

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No I have it clocked at the e6850's stock speed of 3.0ghz, and it runs about 40-50C idle, according to CoreTemp and my BIOS System Monitor. It's at a default 1.32V, and I have no idea why its running so hot, it's not a stock cooler its some Intel approved "overclocking proof" cooler, which is clearly bs.
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#23
james_8970

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Are you using thermal paste? How much did you apply if so?
You really need to reseat that CPU heatsink asap.
James
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#24
jhemfl

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Well here's the thing, I bought a LCD bay device that is supposedly supposed to display my computers tempurature and it hooks up to a 4 pin peripheral power cable and that displays my temperature as 20-30C idle, but when I use CoreTemp and check in my BIOS it says that my PC is running 40-50C.

I'm guessing that my $19 dollar bay device is incorrect, but I don't understand how my computer can be running that hot, I installed my heatsink and used thermal paste. Everything is well, and I've been using my computer for 3 months now, (never checked the temperature before) and when I was messing around with some overclocking settings, I used coretemp and BIOs system monitor to check and it said 40C-50C and I know that is too hot for idle, thats where this all began.
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#25
james_8970

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Has the Vcore been reduced to 1.35V year? The 1.42V that you were reporting is to much for the stock air cooler to handle.
Yes that LCD bay is wrong.
James
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#26
stettybet0

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To clear up some voltage stuff:

1.35V is the maximum voltage that Intel recommends for the Core 2 Duos (at least for the E6xxx lineup). However they can handle more than that (can't give an exact number as the maximum voltage varies from chip to chip), but Intel says only 1.35V to prevent people from complaining when they set their voltage higher without proper cooling and their computer starts crashing. Personally, I've run my E6750 at 1.465V to achieve an OC of 3.6ghz. So, being that the E6850 is a higher quality chip, 1.42V seems about right (perhaps even a bit too low) to achieve an OC of 3.6ghz with it.
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#27
james_8970

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To clear up some voltage stuff:

1.35V is the maximum voltage that Intel recommends for the Core 2 Duos (at least for the E6xxx lineup). However they can handle more than that (can't give an exact number as the maximum voltage varies from chip to chip), but Intel says only 1.35V to prevent people from complaining when they set their voltage higher without proper cooling and their computer starts crashing. Personally, I've run my E6750 at 1.465V to achieve an OC of 3.6ghz. So, being that the E6850 is a higher quality chip, 1.42V seems about right (perhaps even a bit too low) to achieve an OC of 3.6ghz with it.

Any chip can handle any amount of voltage (well not any, but basically anything your motherboard can administer to it). The problem is over time, the silicon degrades and renders the CPU useless. It's not advisable to run any Core2duo in excess of 1.5V.
When you increase the voltage you increase the heat output of that chip dramatically. For this reason alone, I do not suggest overvolting and CPU on the stock heatsink. I'm running my CPU at 1.48V right now and will increase later one, though I have watercooling so I'm capable of running my CPU at very high voltages.
James

Edited by james_8970, 16 January 2008 - 06:06 PM.

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#28
jhemfl

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No I check, It's on 1.32 stock
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#29
james_8970

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I really don't suggest even running that computer till you get those temps fixed, at the very least DO NOT play any games or use any CPU intensive applications.

If I were you I'd reseat your heatsink. If you are unsure of how to do this please let me know.
James
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