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Can't access Microsoft/Windows websites........


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#1
Zanshin

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Hi Guys 'n Gals,
past week or so, I haven't been able to access any Microsoft site or webpage. I have full Internet connection, accessibilty without problem, but whether I go to Start menu, Windows Update, Windows Catalogue, Microsoft update, or go onto the web to access any of their sites, nobody/nothing will let me in. I have tried the Help Centre and deleted forms, cookies, etc etc. I have also been into Internet Options/Trusted sites and set MSN.com, Mocrosoft etc as allowable access. Everything comes up "Internet Explorer cannot display this web page".
Only thing different I have done recently is to ditch an outdated System mechanic 6 Pro and take on Avast.
A baffled Zanshin.

Edited by Zanshin, 21 January 2008 - 01:49 PM.

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#2
Ztruker

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Hi Zanshin. Since the only thing you've done is switch to Avast, that is where I'd start.

Try disabling it for "VERY" short period of time and see if you can connect. If yes, then you need to look at the Avast restrictions in place. If not, post back and we'll continue to work on this.

Edit: Should also have added, try booting to Safe Mode with Networking and see if you can connect. If yes then something is starting at boot that is causing the problem. Try the following:

Click on Start then Run, type msconfig and press Enter.
Click on the Startup tab and disable everything (I mean everything).
Do a regular boot, see if it runs normal.
If yes then use msconfig to enable several items at a time till you find the culprit.

If no, click on the Services tab. Check the Hide All Microsoft Services box then click the Disable All button.
Again, do a regular boot, see if it runs normal.
If yes then use msconfig to enable services till you find the culprit.

Once you've found the culprit, uninstall it or find out how to eliminate it from your system. Simply disabling it in msconfig is a temporary fix at best.

There is a risk to this process as it will leave your computer unprotected for the length of time it takes you to do this. It would be a very good idea to backup your data first, then if anything happens, recovery is much simpler.

Edited by Ztruker, 21 January 2008 - 06:25 PM.

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#3
Zanshin

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Hi Ztruker,
thanks for the help. I printed your instructions off and think I went through them all as per the guide. Still no difference...complete internet access but none via 'start', 'programs' (Windows Update/Microsoft Update/Windows Catalog)so am still stumped. Any further help appreciated.
Zanshin.
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#4
Zanshin

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Ztruker, just tried ferreting through the options for IE after haveing opened yet another "Internet Explorer cannot display theis web page", went into propertis and found this error message . res://ieframe.dll/dnserror.htm#http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com/ .....does this help in diagnosing?
Zanshin
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#5
Ztruker

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Zanshin, please do the following:

Open a command prompt (Start / Run, type cmd and press Enter).
Enter ipconfig /all > ipconfig.txt
Type notepad ipconfig.txt and press Enter
Copy the contents of the notepad to a reply here.

It should look similar to this:

Windows IP Configuration

Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : Desktop
Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :
Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Unknown
IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
DNS Suffix Search List. . . . . . : router

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection 3:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . : router
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Intel® PRO/100 VE Network Connection
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx
Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.2.11
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.2.1
DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.2.1
DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.2.1
Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Tuesday, January 22, 2008 4:33:25 PM
Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Wednesday, January 23, 2008 4:33:25 PM

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#6
Zanshin

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Hi again Ztruker,

Windows IP Configuration



Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : mesh

Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :

Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Unknown

IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No



Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:



Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected

Description . . . . . . . . . . . : VIA Rhine II Fast Ethernet Adapter

Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-01-6C-2D-BE-32



Ethernet adapter Wireless Network Connection 4:



Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :

Description . . . . . . . . . . . : RT73 USB Wireless LAN Card

Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-08-A1-A9-E8-9F

Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes

Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.2

Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0

IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::208:a1ff:fea9:e89f%6

Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1

DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1

DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1

fec0:0:0:ffff::1%1

fec0:0:0:ffff::2%1

fec0:0:0:ffff::3%1

Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : 22 January 2008 23:42:05

Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : 23 January 2008 23:42:05



Tunnel adapter Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface:



Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :

Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface

Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : FF-FF-FF-FF-FF-FF-FF-FF

Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No

IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::ffff:ffff:fffd%5

Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :

NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Disabled



Tunnel adapter Automatic Tunneling Pseudo-Interface:



Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :

Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Automatic Tunneling Pseudo-Interface

Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : C0-A8-00-02

Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No

IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::5efe:192.168.0.2%2

Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :

DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : fec0:0:0:ffff::1%1

fec0:0:0:ffff::2%1

fec0:0:0:ffff::3%1

NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Disabled


Thanks once again
Zanshin.
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#7
Ztruker

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This is a laptop with wireless internet access, right? If so, I don't recognize the following lines:

IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::208:a1f

fec0:0:0:ffff::1%1
fec0:0:0:ffff::2%1
fec0:0:0:ffff::3%1


Does it have something to do with Teredo Tunneling? From what I can find this has to do with IPv6 netowrking.

What kind of network do you have? Can you please describe your complete setup, end to end, from the broadband modem to your laptop.
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#8
Zanshin

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Hi Ztruker,
sorry it's been so long, had a load of visitors from across the Spanish border suddenly descend on us.
Ok.........
My computer is desktop, pre-loaded Windows XP so no disc recieving download speed of constant 54 MBps. Mesh operating system, Windows XP SP2, Home Edition 2002 . 512 MB ram with 320 gig external hard drive ((Packard Bell save and store) AMD Athlon ™ 1.67 gghz.
Wife has laptop, HP Pavillion, ZD 8000, two years old, no problems.
We both have WiFi connection from Netgear Modem Router DG834G v2.
Haven't a clue what Toredo Tunelling is.
My machine seems to be the portal (God knows how this got configured) for incoming WiFi signal and quite often when I lose internet connection, so does wife's laptop.....occasionally my connection goes down but hers will stay hooked up (weird??!!).
We also have a HP All-in-One 7210 fax/printer/copier which is hard wired but experiencing no problems with connectivity.
Any more info needed?
Regards
Zanshin.

p.s. One other problem I have had for recent months is when my internet connection goes down, I am unable to refresh/repair as it always tells me it cannot disconect the network adaptor. Also, found this on the 'net...........

So you’ve installed Windows Vista and you’ve run ‘ipconfig /all’ from the command prompt. You might have noticed a few extra interfaces, but not really understand what they are. You trust Microsoft to be secure-by-default, so you forget about them.



If your brain works anything like mine, the word ‘Teredo’ will stand out as a keyword to search on and you’ll eventually get to these two articles:

http://en.wikipedia....eredo_tunneling
http://www.microsoft...pv6/teredo.mspx
Teredo is a networking protocol designed by Microsoft that allows clients on an IPv4 network behind a NAT router to access the IPv6 Internet.

IPv4 Network Address Translation (NAT)
First an explanation of how most home users, small offices and increasingly more business access the Internet. Because the IPv4 address space is running out, NAT has taken off as a mechanism for multiple clients sharing the same Internet connection and public IP address.



In this diagram, the NAT router uses a single IPv4 public IP address and ‘translates’ it to a private IP address for the client. The way it does this is by watching all the traffic that the client is sending out to the Internet.

e.g. A web request to microsoft.com would look like this to the NAT router:

Source IP: 192.168.0.50

Source port: 1024

Destination IP: 207.46.192.254

Destination port: 80

But obviously, when microsoft.com receives this request and tries to send a response back - it won’t know how to connect to 192.168.0.50, because this is a private IP address.

What NAT does is changes the Source IP/Port before sending the request off and keeps the request in a ‘translation table’. So the request becomes:

Source IP: 203.219.21.70

Source port: 60101

Destination IP: 207.46.192.254

Destination port: 80

Then when microsoft.com receives this modified request, it sends a response back to the NAT router. The NAT router then looks in it’s translation table and sees that it IS expecting a response back. It modifies the destination IP and port and passes it back to the client:

Source IP: 207.46.192.254

Source port: 80

Destination IP: 192.168.0.50

Destination port: 1024

Teredo
Teredo is enabled by default in Windows Vista.

Teredo is an IPv6 transition technology that allows automatic IPv6 tunneling between hosts that are located across one or more IPv4 NATs. IPv6 traffic from Teredo hosts can flow across NATs because it is sent as an IPv4 UDP message. If the NAT supports UDP port translation, then the NAT supports Teredo. The exception is a symmetric NAT, which is described in “Types of NATs” in this article.

Teredo is designed as a last resort transition technology for IPv6 connectivity. If native IPv6, 6to4, or Intrasite Automatic Tunnel Addressing Protocol (ISATAP) connectivity is present, the host does not act as a Teredo client. As more IPv4 edge devices are upgraded to support 6to4 and IPv6 connectivity becomes ubiquitous, Teredo will be used less and less until finally it is not used at all.

The Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface attempts to auto-configure itself. When it does, it gets assigned an IPv6 IP address. This address will look something like this:

2001:0:4136:e38e:14e4:2ca1:3424:eab9

This may look like just a random number, but there’s lots of extra information encoded in here.

Teredo IPv6 addresses


Teredo Prefix
The first 32bits of a Teredo address are always:

2001::/32

Teredo Server IPv4 Address
This indicates the currently configured Teredo Server.

A Teredo server is an IPv6/IPv4 node that is connected to both the IPv4 Internet and the IPv6 Internet, supports a Teredo tunneling interface over which packets are received. The general role of the Teredo server is to assist in the address configuration of Teredo client and to facilitate the initial communication between Teredo clients and other Teredo clients or between Teredo clients and IPv6-only hosts. The Teredo server listens on UDP port 3544 for Teredo traffic.

By default in Windows Vista the Teredo server is configured as teredo.ipv6.microsoft.com

Resolving this address gives us 5 possible IP addresses.

Name: teredo.ipv6.microsoft.com

Addresses: 65.54.227.136, 65.54.227.138, 65.54.227.140, 65.54.227.142, 65.54.227.144

When we convert these IP addresses to their HEX equivalent, we end up with:

65.54.227.136 = 4136:e388

65.54.227.138 = 4136:e38a

65.54.227.140 = 4136:e38c

65.54.227.142 = 4136:e38e

65.54.227.144 = 4136:e390

If you need to change your Teredo server, you can do it by opening the command prompt as an administrator and running:

netsh interf7ace ipv6 set teredo servername=teredo.server.com

Teredo Flags
The next 16 bits for are reserved for Teredo flags.

The 16 bits within the Flags field for Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008-based Teredo clients consists of the following: CRAAAAUG AAAAAAAA.

The C bit is for the Cone flag.
The R bit is reserved for future use.
The U bit is for the Universal/Local flag (set to 0).
The G bit is Individual/Group flag (set to 0).
The A bits are set to a 12-bit randomly generated number.
By using a random number for the A bits, a malicious user that has determined the rest of the Teredo address by capturing the initial configuration exchange of packets between the Teredo client and Teredo server will have to try up to 4,096 (212) different addresses to determine a Teredo client’s address during an address scan.

In my address, the Teredo flags are: 14e4

Converting 0×14e4 to binary, we get the following:

00010100 11100100
CRAAAAUG AAAAAAAA

Which means that the ‘Cone’, ‘Universal’ and ‘Group’ flags are not set. Yay!

Obscured External Port
The next 16 bits store an obscured version of the external UDP port corresponding to all Teredo traffic for this Teredo client.

Obscuring the external port prevents NATs from translating the external port within the payload of the packets that they are forwarding.

Obscured port: 2ca1

XOR with 0xFFFF = 0xD35E

0xD35E = UDP port 54110

Obscured External Address
The last 32 bits store an obscured version of the external IPv4 address corresponding to all Teredo traffic for this Teredo client. The unobscured IP address can be obtained by XORing with 0xFFFFFFFF and then converting the decimal result to dotted-decimal notation. This tool might help.

Obscured IP: 3424:eab9

XOR with 0xFFFFFFFF = 0xCBDB1546

0xCBDB15 46 = Decimal 3420132678

Converted to dotted-decimal notation: 203.219.21.70

But how do I access the IPv6 Internet with Teredo???


To actually access the IPv6 Internet with Teredo, you need a Teredo Relay. A Teredo Relay potentially requires a lot of network bandwidth.

While Microsoft has been operating a set of Teredo servers ever since the first Teredo pseudo-tunnel for Windows XP was released, it has never provided a Teredo relay service for the IPv6 Internet as a whole.

I have tried a few Teredo servers, but none of them seem to relay. This is something that I will continue exploring. I’m going to try and set up Miredo somewhere and see what I can learn.

Edited by Zanshin, 29 January 2008 - 03:36 AM.

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#9
Ztruker

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Zanshin, I also looked up and found the same information you did, but not having any experience with it, I didn't understand what it was all about. I understand the terminology and what tunneling is, but overall I don't get it.

My question is, why do you have this? The Netgear DG834G is a standard wireless router so both of you should be getting your IP address from it, and your computer being on or not should not have any effect on your wife's connection. Is the Toledo Tunneling something your ISP requires?

I'm afraid I'm out of my league on this one. I'm going to ask that it be moved to the Networking forum. Hopefully you will get better help there.

Edit: Zanshin, the networking forum is here: http://www.geekstogo...orking-f11.html

If you don't think this should be moved please let me know and if it's already been moved we can move it back.

Edited by Ztruker, 29 January 2008 - 04:09 PM.

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#10
Zanshin

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Ztruker,
thanks for all your help and now for pointing me in the right direction.
Zanshin.
p.s. How will I know if/when it has been moved and when/how to expect a response?

Edited by Zanshin, 29 January 2008 - 04:31 PM.

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#11
Ztruker

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We should both get a notification via E-mail.
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#12
ScHwErV

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Thread moved.
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#13
Zanshin

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Hi,
am I finally in the right thread for help on my problem please? I have read all the related links/threads below and none seem able to help with my problem.
Regards
Zanshin.
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#14
Ax238

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Only Microsoft websites? Let's check your hosts file. Open notepad, then go to File | Open. Paste the following path into the File Name box:
C:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc

Next, make sure you have it showing all file types, rather than just txt files. Choose and open the "hosts" file. Copy and paste the contents of this file into your next post. If it has too many entries, you can optionally zip it and attach it.

Regards,

Ax
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#15
Zanshin

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Hi Ax, thanks for the help in advance. There appears to be four hosts files so I have included all.....
'hosts(1) hosts(2) hostsmsn and lmhosts.
# Copyright © 1993-1999 Microsoft Corp.
#
# This is a sample HOSTS file used by Microsoft TCP/IP for Windows.
#
# This file contains the mappings of IP addresses to host names. Each
# entry should be kept on an individual line. The IP address should
# be placed in the first column followed by the corresponding host name.
# The IP address and the host name should be separated by at least one
# space.
#
# Additionally, comments (such as these) may be inserted on individual
# lines or following the machine name denoted by a '#' symbol.
#
# For example:
#
# 102.54.94.97 rhino.acme.com # source server
# 38.25.63.10 x.acme.com # x client host
127.0.0.1 localhost

192.168.0.2 HP000D9D281C31

................................................................................
..............................................

## Copyright © 1993-2001 Microsoft Corp.
#
# This file has been automatically generated for use by Microsoft Internet
# Connection Sharing. It contains the mappings of IP addresses to host names
# for the home network. Please do not make changes to the HOSTS.ICS file.
# Any changes may result in a loss of connectivity between machines on the
# local network.
#

#192.168.0.1 mesh.mshome.net # 2011 9 2 13 7 6 30 609
................................................................................
...................................................
# Copyright © 1993-1999 Microsoft Corp.
#
# This is a sample HOSTS file used by Microsoft TCP/IP for Windows.
#
# This file contains the mappings of IP addresses to host names. Each
# entry should be kept on an individual line. The IP address should
# be placed in the first column followed by the corresponding host name.
# The IP address and the host name should be separated by at least one
# space.
#
# Additionally, comments (such as these) may be inserted on individual
# lines or following the machine name denoted by a '#' symbol.
#
# For example:
#
# 102.54.94.97 rhino.acme.com # source server
# 38.25.63.10 x.acme.com # x client host
127.0.0.1 localhost

192.168.0.2 HP000D9D281C31
................................................................................
...............................................

# Copyright © 1993-1999 Microsoft Corp.
#
# This is a sample LMHOSTS file used by the Microsoft TCP/IP for Windows.
#
# This file contains the mappings of IP addresses to computernames
# (NetBIOS) names. Each entry should be kept on an individual line.
# The IP address should be placed in the first column followed by the
# corresponding computername. The address and the computername
# should be separated by at least one space or tab. The "#" character
# is generally used to denote the start of a comment (see the exceptions
# below).
#
# This file is compatible with Microsoft LAN Manager 2.x TCP/IP lmhosts
# files and offers the following extensions:
#
# #PRE
# #DOM:<domain>
# #INCLUDE <filename>
# #BEGIN_ALTERNATE
# #END_ALTERNATE
# \0xnn (non-printing character support)
#
# Following any entry in the file with the characters "#PRE" will cause
# the entry to be preloaded into the name cache. By default, entries are
# not preloaded, but are parsed only after dynamic name resolution fails.
#
# Following an entry with the "#DOM:<domain>" tag will associate the
# entry with the domain specified by <domain>. This affects how the
# browser and logon services behave in TCP/IP environments. To preload
# the host name associated with #DOM entry, it is necessary to also add a
# #PRE to the line. The <domain> is always preloaded although it will not
# be shown when the name cache is viewed.
#
# Specifying "#INCLUDE <filename>" will force the RFC NetBIOS (NBT)
# software to seek the specified <filename> and parse it as if it were
# local. <filename> is generally a UNC-based name, allowing a
# centralized lmhosts file to be maintained on a server.
# It is ALWAYS necessary to provide a mapping for the IP address of the
# server prior to the #INCLUDE. This mapping must use the #PRE directive.
# In addtion the share "public" in the example below must be in the
# LanManServer list of "NullSessionShares" in order for client machines to
# be able to read the lmhosts file successfully. This key is under
# \machine\system\currentcontrolset\services\lanmanserver\parameters\nullsessionshares
# in the registry. Simply add "public" to the list found there.
#
# The #BEGIN_ and #END_ALTERNATE keywords allow multiple #INCLUDE
# statements to be grouped together. Any single successful include
# will cause the group to succeed.
#
# Finally, non-printing characters can be embedded in mappings by
# first surrounding the NetBIOS name in quotations, then using the
# \0xnn notation to specify a hex value for a non-printing character.
#
# The following example illustrates all of these extensions:
#
# 102.54.94.97 rhino #PRE #DOM:networking #net group's DC
# 102.54.94.102 "appname \0x14" #special app server
# 102.54.94.123 popular #PRE #source server
# 102.54.94.117 localsrv #PRE #needed for the include
#
# #BEGIN_ALTERNATE
# #INCLUDE \\localsrv\public\lmhosts
# #INCLUDE \\rhino\public\lmhosts
# #END_ALTERNATE
#
# In the above example, the "appname" server contains a special
# character in its name, the "popular" and "localsrv" server names are
# preloaded, and the "rhino" server name is specified so it can be used
# to later #INCLUDE a centrally maintained lmhosts file if the "localsrv"
# system is unavailable.
#
# Note that the whole file is parsed including comments on each lookup,
# so keeping the number of comments to a minimum will improve performance.
# Therefore it is not advisable to simply add lmhosts file entries onto the
# end of this file.

Regards
Zasnshin
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