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snails pace!


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#1
Trash man

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hello all
a couple of days ago i had this question so i asked around.
i got all sorts of weird answers. so i thought i would ask here.

what makes a computer fast! i mean what does the speed depend on????
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#2
Neil Jones

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Many factors.
Amount of memory, speed of memory, processor speed, processor load, running programs, condition of hard drives, fragmentation of hard drives, condition of the Windows, condition of the user account, peripherals connected/used... you name it, it may be dependent.
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#3
Trash man

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ya but there must be some core component that makes the most difference.... and wat is actually "fast"
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#4
Neil Jones

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There is no core component. All the bits are essentially a team.
You can have a slow processor but fast memory, and vice-versa.
What constitutes "fast" in your eyes might be slow in somebody else's eyes.
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#5
Seltox

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Even where your things are stored on your hard drive can make a difference (faster on the outside, slower on the inside). When making your partitions, make the partitions for things you need to be fastest first. Such as your Operating System. As partitions will be created from the outside of the disk, to the inside (a harddrive has an actual moving disk inside of it. It spins and an 'arm' thing reads it as it passes. Obviously it will be traveling faster at the outside of the disk).

Personally, I take the processor as being the most important thing, but if the rest of your computer isn't very good, putting in that Core2 Quad processor simply won't help very much at all. As it has already been said - a computer is like a team, only as good as it's worst part. Kinda.
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#6
stettybet0

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This is kind of like asking "how does the human body work?"

Well, you need the brain to think, so obviously it's the brain that is important.

Oh, wait but that brain needs oxygen, to be supplied by the lungs and carried by arteries in blood which is pumped by the heart.

I don't want to go through a whole anatomy lesson here, but you get the picture. There is no one key part that just magically makes a computer "go". All of the parts (and the health and quality of all those parts) are important for a well functioning PC.
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#7
Trash man

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hm... makes sense give me an example.
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#8
Neil Jones

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hm... makes sense give me an example.


This is beginning to sound like you're looking for an answer to a school/college assignment question.
Please forgive me, but the ideology presented in this thread alone is not exactly difficult to follow. So you should be able to work out an example on your own.
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#9
Trash man

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ok thanks anyway
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