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Simple PSU question on first build


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#1
adorableedgar

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Should i pick the 115v or the 230v option on the back of the PSU? i did some research but i can't seem to find any place that gives me a straight forward question. from what i've learned i should pick the 115v option since i live in the US (HOWEVER I READ IN A WEBSITE THAT THE U.S. USES 120v plugs :), is the 5v difference okay?) but im still afraid to plug in set at 115v because in a book i have i read that if you happen to have a 230v receptacle(and i set the PSU at 115v) i will know right away with "showers of sparks and clouds of smoke" :) so i really really would like someone to completely confirm that i DO SET IT TO 115v. (i live in Atlanta, Georgia, United States)
thank you so much in advanced

Edited by adorableedgar, 20 February 2008 - 03:55 PM.

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#2
adorableedgar

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Also, i know my title says "120v and 240v" but my PSU has the options of 115 and 230, which makes me even more worried because what i've read says the U.S. uses 120v outlets not 115v...
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#3
Neil Jones

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230v is a European standard. Only set your PSU to this if you live in an area/country that has electricity coming through at 230v. Likewise don't set it to 115v if you don't live in a 115v area. Things will look very pretty but it won't half smell.

Anyway:


In the US and Canada, 220 volts, 230 volts, and 240 volts are used interchangeably to describe one voltage range that is used to power larger appliances. Similarly, 110 volts, 115 volts, and 120 volts all refer to the one voltage range that is available through the common electrical outlet. The sources of these seemingly different numbers is as follows:

1. The 220 volt and 110 volt designations are older and familiar terminology, but are no longer used in either product design or by electric utilities in the US and Canada.
2. The 230 volt and 115 volt terminology comes from equipment design standards. Equipment is commonly designed to operate at 230 or 115 volts plus or minus 10%.
3. Electric utilities typically deliver electricity, under standard conditions, at 240 volts and 120 volts plus or minus 5% at the transformer.


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#4
adorableedgar

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yay so i will set it to 115v. thank you BUT i have another problem..... im building my system right now and it turns out that the motherboard is raised too high when i put on the stand-offs...the reason is beacuse the case has 4 bumps with holes for stand-offs but when i uses these bumped holes the motherboard is raised too high. The case also has other holes without the bumps that also fit the motherboard and will leave it at perfect height to fit the rear I/O panel BUT the problem is that if i put the stand off in the lower holes the motherboard touches the bumped holes...and im afraid this would short my board if i do this...or is this okay? OR will i have to go HULK on my case and hammer those bumps down?

Edited by adorableedgar, 20 February 2008 - 04:29 PM.

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#5
adorableedgar

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anyone please??
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#6
Neil Jones

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The bumped holes are there for a reason. They act as stand-offs on their own. Please don't screw any extra stand-offs into them otherwise you'll never get the side back on. Do not hammer the bumps down.

You only need to add extra stand-offs as and when in the provided holes where there aren't bumped areas that match up with the holes in the motherboard. You don't need to drill anything extra.
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