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Adding Switch to LAN


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#1
gabebillings

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I've currently got a smallish LAN setup inside my house. I've got cable internet through Comcast which goes out of the cable modem and into an aging Linksys WRT54G. I've got all the ports used up, connecting to 2 HTPCs, one desktop and a networked printer. I've also got a pair of laptops; one with internal G and the other with Draft-N.

Everything is working fine, but I'm realizing that the 100Mbps max on the router is a bottleneck when moving big files around from the fixed PCs. If I want to upgrade to gigabit networking, can I just get a 1000Mbps switch, connect it to the existing router with an ethernet cable and run all the current wires from it to the existing PCs? Or is there more to it than that?

As another option, I could just get a draft N router with 1000Mbps LAN, which wouldn't be a huge amount more than just getting a switch, and I'd have one fewer pieces of equipment for my wife to sigh about.
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#2
MichWasHere

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Nope, thats about it.

Just make sure that the router gets plugged into an auto crossover port (usually called an uplink port, or read the switch manual, quite often port 1 will do this as well). If it doesn't have the auto crossover you will need to use a crossover cable for the router connection.
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#3
dsenette

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Just make sure that the router gets plugged into an auto crossover port (usually called an uplink port, or read the switch manual, quite often port 1 will do this as well). If it doesn't have the auto crossover you will need to use a crossover cable for the router connection.

you actually shouldn't need a crossover or an uplink port to connect the router to the switch....in multiport "home" routers (such as the one described above) all the ports are straightthrough ports. the ports on the router aren't actually "router ports" they're ports for the built in 10/100 switch in the router...if it weren't for the built in switch...you'd need a crossover to plug your computer into the router as well

larger scale or older routers do require crossover connections but this is only for routers that are not designed with built in switches


:)
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#4
MichWasHere

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Thanks dsenette, way to make a girl feel old and office bound :)
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#5
dsenette

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i don't know why but i keep seeing a T in your name (MITCHwashere)...however mich is different ain't it? hahaha


your information is technically correct....just...slightly out of date
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#6
gabebillings

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Thanks for the info!

I've got a follow up question. Let's say I've got all the ports on the gigabit switch filled, but still have one or two things plugged into the original router. All devices plugged into the gigabit switch will have a gigabit connection to one another, but will still be still be bottlenecked by the 100Mbps connection when transmitting to anything plugged into the router, correct?

That includes the internet connection, but that doesn't matter since it's never going to get even close to the 100Mbps connecting it to the switch.
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#7
dsenette

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everything you just said is true.....so only put 10/100 devices (if possible) to the router directly...since those won't get the advantages that the gigabit switch would provide
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