Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

intel dual core vs amd dual core


  • Please log in to reply

#1
bastengo

bastengo

    New Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
I have been looking into new computers because mine died. I was considering getting a intel quad core computer then some one asked if I really needed that much power when most programs barely use more than a single core let alone a dual core. So I was thinking I should just go with a dual core chip with the best graphics card I can get. The things is I have been doing a lot of reading and I wanted to find out which of the dual cores are the best for intel and for amd. Then from those chips which is considered the fastest and best for games movies and music.

as a side note anyone have and good recommendation for a great website to build a computer to compare to dell and such.

thanks as always.

b
  • 0

Advertisements


#2
Troy

Troy

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 8,839 posts
Hi there, welcome to Geeks to Go!

First, my condolences. RIP to your old computer :)

Whoever that "someone" is has started to ask you some very important questions. We need some answers to these so we can help you better by recommending parts that would suit you:
  • What uses do you have for a computer?
  • What programs do you run?
A computer that is used for heavy multimedia (e.g. video) editing will definitely benefit from a quad-core processor. Most other programs, current games included, run very well on a dual-core processor.

Currently, the Intel processors are holding the title for performance, both the Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Quad series. What is best for you depends on your answers to the questions listed above.

There are a few websites that build computers. Alienware is an example that comes to mind.

Cheers

Troy
  • 0

#3
bastengo

bastengo

    New Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
thank you for the quick response. I do zero video editing only games, watching movies, listening to music, and internet. I went to dell's website today and they sell the intel 6600 quad core and the intel core 2 duo for the same price. That being said should I got quad core if i end up going with dell or does the intel 2 duo just have amazing preformace.


thanks again

b
  • 0

#4
Troy

Troy

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 8,839 posts
Hi there,

I have an Intel Core 2 Duo E6750 and it does have "amazing" performance :)

Dell have the Q6600 listed as the same price as what processor? The chances are that the Core 2 Duo in question has a higher GHz rating, which will benefit your uses as you play games and other general computer uses.

If you like, you can give us a budget and we can help you find the best value computer for your $$$. I take it from your posts, that you are looking to purchase a ready-made unit? Are you interested in building your own at all? If you are in any way technically-inclined, and can follow manual instructions, I highly recommend building your own as you will have a much better system for your budget range, and the satisfaction of saying "I made it!"

Also, there are many well-written online "How to build a computer" tutorials that you can follow.

Either way, just let us know if we can assist you any further, we'd be more than happy to help :)

Cheers

Troy
  • 0

#5
bastengo

bastengo

    New Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
Hey troy I am looking to spend about $1000.00 or less. I am decent with computer stuff but installing OS and working with Bios I am know pretty much nothing. I have installed new hard drives ram graphics cards before but that is pretty much the limit. I have heard that because of the quantity Dell buys products in that you can get some amazing deals on stuff that would cost you a bit more. As a side note I receive a 12% discount on dell products.

Let me know what your think and thank you so much for all your help
  • 0

#6
Troy

Troy

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 8,839 posts

I have installed new hard drives ram graphics cards before but that is pretty much the limit.

Hi there,

With this comment I would really recommend you build and install your own computer. It's definitely an enjoyable experience and there's not too much more to it than what you've already done. With this experience you have mentioned, you easily have the skills needed to follow instructions correctly.

However, with your 12% discount at Dell, that may tip it in your favour, so you need to think carefully over this decision.

While I believe Dell build reasonably good computers, you often have a limited upgrade path without doing some major changes. For this reason also, I suggest building your own.

Configuring the BIOS can be pretty straight forward - I know my motherboard manual had quite a few pages in detail about what each setting does. I didn't touch most of the settings, just configured what I knew I'd need. I simply changed the Boot Priority Order around so that it looks for a CD first, then the main hard drive.

Installing the OS is simply booting the computer from the disc (by having it in the drive), selecting your options and watching while it does it all for you :)

For $1000 you could have quite a nice little system. Let us know your thoughts, and we'll continue further :)

Cheers

Troy
  • 0

#7
bastengo

bastengo

    New Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
Troy thank for all your help and time I went with a dell, I think I found a great deal. I was not able to get the graphics card I wanted but I figure I can always butyand install one in the future if need be. I got all this for $812.00 after taxes and shipping. Hope I got a good deal


-- Dell Inspiron 530 --
-- Intel Core 2 Quad Processor Q6600 (8MB L2 cache,2.4GHz,1066FSB)
-----------------------
-- Memory --
-- 4GB Dual Channel DDR2 SDRAM at 800MHz- 4DIMMs
-----------------------
-- Keyboard and Mouse Bundles --
-- Dell USB Keyboard and Dell Optical USB Mouse
-----------------------
-- Video Cards --
-- nVidia GeForce 8600GT-DDR3 256MB---
-- Hard Drives --
-----------------------
-- 250GB Serial ATA Hard Drive (7200RPM) w/DataBurst Cache蒂
-----------------------
-- Floppy Drive and Media Reader --
-- Dell 19 in 1 Media Card Reader
-----------------------
-- Operating System --
-- Genuine Windows Vista® Home Premium - English
-----------------------
-- Mouse --
-- Mouse included with Keyboard purchase
-----------------------
-- Network Interface --
-- Integrated 10/100 Ethernet
-----------------------
-- Modem and Wireless --
-- Dell 1505 Wireless-N PCIe Card
-----------------------
-- Adobe Software --
-- Adobe® Acrobat® Reader 8.1
-----------------------
-- Optical Drive --
-- 16X DVD+/-RW Drive
-----------------------
-- Sound Cards --
-- Integrated Sound Blaster®Audigy蒂 HD Software Edition
-----------------------
-- Office Productivity Software (Pre-Installed) --
-- Microsoft Works 9.0
-- [420-8085]
-----------------------
-- Warranty & Service --
-- 1Yr In-Home Service, Parts + Labor, 24x7 Phone Support
-----------------------
-- DataSafe Online Backup --
-- Included 3 GB DataSafe Online Backup for 1Yr
  • 0

#8
Rocknrollcows

Rocknrollcows

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 432 posts
I Personally have a Dell, though I changed out most of it's parts.

Problem with Dell computers is that unless you get a XPS, you can't overclock it yourself.

Most Dell cases also have pretty bad airflow and they look strange. Changing a PSU is just annoying.

also their motherboards are proprietary (except a highend XPS which use SLI mobos) which means it will be hard to change stuff later or if it fries, you will have to spend.

just keep in mind that building a computer by yourself is 89.99% always more enjoyable ( if the parts don't DOA :) )! You also get Bragging rights!
  • 0

#9
madprofessor

madprofessor

    New Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
I would say always build rather than buy.
  • It is usually cheaper - a friend of mine recently bought what I could have built her for something like £100 less.
  • If something goes wrong you'll be able to fix it yourself.
  • As your needs/demands on a system grow it will be easier to upgrade it.
  • The knowledge you will gain along the way may even be useful in your career - might even point you towards a new career!
  • When you finish and it works, it's a great feeling "I built that" :)
  • Building a pc is actually an enjoyable way to spend an evening.

  • 0

#10
Case Mods

Case Mods

    New Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
If your looking to do more gaming, Then get an Intel.

If your going to use your PC for a Workhorse machine, Then AMD is better.

Thats my opinion.

I am just telling you by experience which one is better or what not.
  • 0

#11
sewildman50

sewildman50

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 93 posts
I agree with the recommendation to build. The thing with building your own (at least in my experience) is that you tend to spend a little bit at a time, gradually upgrading parts until the whole thing is generally outdated and you start over. My first build was a great experience with an Abit motherboard, Athlon processor, and some Buffalo RAM. It just recently became too much for me to bear and I threw 500 bones down for the following barebones kit from TigerDirect;

Mobo: XFX nForce 680i LT (socket 775)
Processor: Intel Core 2 Quad Q6700 2.66GHz
RAM: 2048MB (2x1024) OCZ DDR2 PC6400
HD: Seagate Barracuda 250GB 7200.11 SATA
Power Supply: Ultra LSP750 750 watt ATX
Case: Ultra X-Blaster ATX Mid-Tower

I added the following new Video Card: XFX GeForce 8800GT PCI-express (Alpha Dog Edition) and switched out a few of the better components from my old computer (Mini Typhoon CPU cooler, Modular power supply, 500gb hard drive, case fans, DVD drive) and now I'm left with a semi-dated computer that I can still use for some games, internet, email, etc., and a new mid-range gaming rig that I hooked up to my 40" Samsung LCD TV.

As you may have read in another thread I started, the motherboard is being RMA'd but as frustrating as that can be, the overall experience enjoyed and gained makes it worth it.
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP