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Just want to ask about Compression.


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#1
SHENGTON

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Just want to ask about Compression. I got here a video clip which is 98,919MB size. When I compressed it using WinRar it took only 90,717MB. I thought that when I compress it it will reduce to 50% of the size.

Now my question is:
What do you think is problem? The WinRar compressor isn't that effective?
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#2
happyrock

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video and mp3 files don't compress very much if at all..
with that said you can try this...

To compress a digital media file to make it smaller, you can convert it to a Windows Media file using Windows Media Encoder. The encoder is often thought of as a tool for compressing files that can be streamed over networks, however, you can also use compression to simply make file sizes smaller, so you can fit more of them on a hard disk.

To encode a file to make it smaller, do the following:

1.In Windows Media Encoder, click the New Session taskbar button.

2.Click Convert a File, and then enter the following information in the New Session Wizard:


File Selection. Enter the names and path of the source and output files.


Content Distribution. Select File download (computer playback).


Encoding Options. Choose the level of quality that you want for the audio and video by selecting how you will use the file. Note the bit rate after making a selection; the higher the quality, the higher the bit rate, and the larger the file.

3.Review your settings, and then click Finish.

4.On the taskbar, click the Start Encoding button.

Play back the file and check for quality. Then, check the size of the file in Windows Explorer. You can change encoding options (bit rate) and re-encode the file if necessary, to find the balance that you need between quality and file size.
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#3
Neil Jones

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How much a file compresses depends on the amount of redundant data inside the file. You can't just zip it up and expect the file size to drop by 50%, in some cases you'll be lucky for it to compress at all, in fact you could make it bigger.
Raw AVI video files compress like there's no tomorrow when MPEG-2 gets its grubby little hands on them, for example. JPEG files don't compress well because there is no redundant data.
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#4
SHENGTON

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What do you mean about the "redundant data" Sir?
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#5
Neil Jones

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Redundant data is effectively padding the file out so it complies with the file format used by the program in question. Windows Bitmap files made with Paint contain so much redundant data you could tarmac the front drive with it. But when you compress the file, this redundant data can be easily squashed together inside the file itself. Same ideology if you save a Paint file as a JPEG file, the size of the JPEG can be anything up to 10% the size of the Paint file. That's because JPEG files handle the redundant data better than Paint files.
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