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Using a laptop power adapter for a flat screen monitor?


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#1
paulcomputerman

paulcomputerman

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Hi everyone,

Thanks for all of your help in advance. I received a monitor from a friend who claimed it didn't work. I said okay and left it there for a couple of months. I found it a few days ago and I found out what the problem is: it was the power cord.

I went on a little excursion through my electronic and computer equipment to find that I did have an adapter that would work: a Toshiba power adapter. Let me give you the specs of each.

Toshiba Laptop Power Adapter
(I will skip the input specs.)
OUTPUT:
19V
3.42A
LPS

Microtek 815C Flat Panel Display Monitor
19Vdc
3A

Are these compatible? Will anything happen to the monitor or the adapter? Will my house catch on fire?

Thanks so much!
Paul
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#2
SRX660

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I downloaded the manual for the monitor and it really does not say much about the adapter other than you can buy a replacement from them. I would think that since the monitor takes a 19 volt 3 amp adapter, the toshiba adapter should work fine. A very slightly higher voltage should not hurt at all.

There are laptop power adapter's that work in a range of voltages and they seem to work on many different laptops so i think varible amps does not hurt anything. As a side note i have several Toshiba laptops and have used power bricks of different amps on all of them with no problems i can see. The amps vary from 1.8 to 3 on the power bricks, and they all use the exact same plug-in cord.

SRX660
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#3
paulcomputerman

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I downloaded the manual for the monitor and it really does not say much about the adapter other than you can buy a replacement from them. I would think that since the monitor takes a 19 volt 3 amp adapter, the toshiba adapter should work fine. A very slightly higher voltage should not hurt at all.

There are laptop power adapter's that work in a range of voltages and they seem to work on many different laptops so i think varible amps does not hurt anything. As a side note i have several Toshiba laptops and have used power bricks of different amps on all of them with no problems i can see. The amps vary from 1.8 to 3 on the power bricks, and they all use the exact same plug-in cord.

SRX660


Thanks for your reply! The only thing I have noticed (can't tell if it is the original) is that the AC cord is 7A, while the adapter's input only wants 1.5A, is this okay?

Thanks again,
Paul
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#4
SRX660

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Theres a lot more amps on any AC line than 7 amps. The circuit breakers are rated at uaually 20 amps before they kick out. The thing is the power brick will take exactly what power it needs to output its rated amps. The rest is just excess that it does not use.

SRX660
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#5
paulcomputerman

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Theres a lot more amps on any AC line than 7 amps. The circuit breakers are rated at uaually 20 amps before they kick out. The thing is the power brick will take exactly what power it needs to output its rated amps. The rest is just excess that it does not use.

SRX660


Okay, thanks!

The adapter seems to get a bit hot, it did that though when I had it plugged in to the laptop. It even has a warning that it may become hot right on the adapter. I am assuming this is okay, correct?

Paul
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#6
SRX660

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Yes, most of my laptops have power bricks that become very warm to touch when running the laptops. Only one that does not is my old Toshiba Portage 660CDT and thats because its only a pentium 150 CPU and doesnt use much power. Some of my laptops will spark when connecting to the power brick so i hook the brick to the laptop then plug in the power cord to the brick. I do this so i may be able to stop any problems with the spark shorting out the laptops connection. This is on both my latest laptops.

SRX660
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#7
paulcomputerman

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Yes, most of my laptops have power bricks that become very warm to touch when running the laptops. Only one that does not is my old Toshiba Portage 660CDT and thats because its only a pentium 150 CPU and doesnt use much power. Some of my laptops will spark when connecting to the power brick so i hook the brick to the laptop then plug in the power cord to the brick. I do this so i may be able to stop any problems with the spark shorting out the laptops connection. This is on both my latest laptops.

SRX660


Okay, thanks so much for your help!
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