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Partitions


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#1
jst42day

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I have received answers to a previous question about what goes where on different partitions.
But I'm a little unsure of the how to of some of it.
I'm supposed to put together a new pc for my kid this weekend.
Installing XP Pro w/SP2 on a 500g hard drive.
OS goes on C.
In the past I'd been told that my programs should go on a different partition.
So am I correct in believing that, as an example, Antivir AV and Threatfire would go on D?
I'm just not sure I understand where to put what.
I'm looking to use around 100g for music and photos, maybe another 100g for other programs including AS, HIPS etc., and the rest for business.
Thanks.
jst42day
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#2
The Admiral

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why were you told to put your programs on a different partition?
If windows gets hosed, you still have to reinstall the programs after reinstalling windows.....
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#3
Artellos

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@ The Admiral
I was always told this:

Putting programs on another partition generally makes the OS boot faster.
Less cluttering on the C: means less loading time.

and Yes, if you reinstall windows you will have to reinstall all your programs due to the registry being built from scratch again.

@ jst42day
Generally how I do it is I install my OS, Protection Software and other basic programs like firefox and some others on the C:
My random stuff like music, games or buisness goes on the D:
I also generally go to my desktop, rightclick my My Documents and instead of having it to C:\Documents and Settings\User\My Documents (not completely sure about the path) I change it to D:\My Documents.

Regards,
Olrik
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#4
jst42day

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Thanks for your help.

Olrik,
I believe what you're talking about is the target folder location.
The info you gave me clears up my question nicely.
Regards.
jst42day
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#5
Artellos

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Nice to hear I could be of assistance.

Regards,
Olrik
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#6
jst42day

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Olrik,
This is a good example of why I get lost so easily.
I changed the documents folder to 'D'.
And found out later that Roboform would no longer work.
It was on D.
So I tried to move it back to C.
Wound up reinstalling RF.
Which brings me back to my question.
How do I prevent this from happening?
Thanks.
jst42day
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#7
happyrock

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the definitive guide to partitioning is here..
This guide shares insights on the subject of hard drive partitioning. Here you will find strategies for the best way to partition your new hard drive. ...
after you decide how many partitions you need and their sizes...
Manage Partitions for Free with QTParted
also get a linux live cd link is at the link below
Even Windows users can run this free Linux hard drive utility. We show you how....here
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#8
jst42day

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Happyrck,
I appreciate your help, but I'm using Disk Director without a problem.
My question is about having programs on a separate partition, which was suggested awile back.
I moved My Documents from C to D and have lost the ability to open Adobe. And Roboform had to be reinstalled.
So what am I missing or doing wrong?
Thanks.
jst42day
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#9
happyrock

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most programs put hooks into windows so they need to be on the same drive with windows...
partition your drive into 3 approx equal parts...I like logical drives but you could set them up as partitions if you prefer....use QParted to do this before you even load windows...
install the OS to the C: as soon as you get it installed...defrag the drive...then set the swap file size ...the minimum and maximum to the same number...it should be 1.5 times the amount of installed ram...this puts both the OS and the swap file on the fastest part of the drive...then install your programs to the C: ...after install a few defrag again...on the second partition/or logical drive...move my documents folder to this area...also set it so all your downloads including programs go there ...when you install the programs let them install to the C: programs folder...that is the fastest part of the drive...
move the my documents folder to the second partition/drive...
The ideal time to relocate the My Document folder and other system folders is when you have just bought a new PC and have yet to load your data or applications.
Click on the Start button and then right-click on My Documents and select Properties. If there's no My Documents in your start menu then right click on the My Documents icon on your desktop instead.

When you've clicked on properties, select "Move" and then navigate to your D: drive. Select the drive letter and then click "Make New Folder." Enter "My Documents" as the folder name and hit Enter and then OK. Windows will then ask you whether you want to move your documents; click Yes.
this puts your music and photos and the like to the second partition/drive...this will keep the C: drive uncluttered and in case you ever have to reinstall windows your data will be safe on the second partition...saves some time

Moving your documents make take some time. Once moved, though, you can access them normally from the "My Documents" icon on the desktop or elsewhere.

In the process you'll free up a lot of room on your C: drive. Defrag the drive so it can be utilized by Windows in the most effective manner.

For more information you can consult this Microsoft document. http://support.micro....com/?id=310147

use the 3rd partition/drive (this is the slowest part of the drive) for your backups... registry backups....movies and or things you rarely ever use..
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#10
jst42day

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Happyryck,
Thanks for your time and help.
Your explanation is pretty easy to follow.
jst42day
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