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Video card upgrade SUGGESTIONS?


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#16
james_8970

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  • Download Rivatuner here
  • Follow the instructions here
In your next post, please include the highest temperature recorded by this program after a 1 hour or greater gaming session.
If you have any questions or concerns, feel free to ask.
James

Edited by james_8970, 05 April 2008 - 09:48 PM.

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#17
strikermed

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COD4 runs at 96.3 degrees Celsius. AAO stays at about 88, and Crysis is around 94. My idle temp is 55. Don't know if that is good or bad.
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#18
james_8970

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That's fairly warm, while you're card *should* be able to operate at those temps fine, I'd want to knock them down about 10-15*C if I were you.
Would there be any way to improve airflow within your case by using twist ties or something for better cable management or by adding some case fans?
James
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#19
strikermed

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that's the thing, I have 2 fans blowing in, from the bottom, 2 fans blowing out under the psu. I have one on clear case cover blowing in, right over the RAM, and the power supply has 2 fans on it. I have those round IDE cables, so they don't block airflow, and they are below the fans that push air into the case... So, all the cables are below the actual micro ATX mobo. I do have PCI cards, most importantly the Wireless, and it is probably teh hottest of them... But still that heat will rise and go to the video card. I don't know what else I can do, other than take out parts, and I took out one of my hard drives, to let better air flow.
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#20
james_8970

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Have you looked at the fan, is it spinning?
James
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#21
Troy

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that's the thing, I have 2 fans blowing in, from the bottom, 2 fans blowing out under the psu. I have one on clear case cover blowing in, right over the RAM, and the power supply has 2 fans on it.

Hi there,

I would change the clear case cover fan to blowing out. At the moment it sounds like you have (in total and excluding PSU) three fans blowing in, and two blowing out. Changing the side fan to blowing out will create a better "vacuum" effect, which should keep the air moving more briskly inside.

Let us know if you try this, and how it works. I would turn the fan around, and then run the tests James has mentioned above.

Cheers

Troy
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#22
strikermed

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All the fans are spinning, I'll try turnning that fan around, and try it out again when i get a chance later this week.
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#23
james_8970

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If you really want to change ypur temps you're likely going to need to re-apply some new thermal compound to your GPU. Changing the flow of air within your case with have a minimal impact (if any) on your GPU's temps.
James
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#24
stettybet0

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If you really want to change ypur temps you're likely going to need to re-apply some new thermal compound to your GPU. Changing the flow of air within your case with have a minimal impact (if any) on your GPU's temps.
James

Before possibly voiding your warranty, why not try using RivaTuner, ATITool, or the Catalyst Control Panel to manually increase the card's fan speed?
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#25
james_8970

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We are talking about a x800, the warranty has long passed as no ATI 3rd party vendor had increased warranty past 1 year till recently. That aside, you could try adjusting the fan speed, but I find it doesn't make much of a difference temperature wise and just adds noise. There is a few exceptions such as when the thermal probe isn't functioning properly and even rarer when the video card BIOS doesn't adjust the fan speed properly (8800GT is the only one I'm aware of).
James
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#26
strikermed

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So how do i go about doing that, and what kind of compound etc.? I truly have no idea how to mess with a video card other than installing it in the case.
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#27
james_8970

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Before proceeding you need to be aware that this could potentially damage you're computer rather then help it. Like anything, there are risks involved, that being said this should improve your temperatures by far the most over any other alternative method. Follow the below at your own risk.

The first time, it may seem overwhelming, but in all honestly, think about it being a CPU because essentially you are doing the exact same thing as what you'd do with a CPU, replacing the thermal compound.

The things that you'll need:
1. Thermal paste
2. Isopropanol 99% Alcohol (can be found at any drug store)
3. Paper towel
4. Thermal compound, for the GPU I highly suggest a ceramic based thermal compound like MX-2. Metallic based thermal compounds (e.g. arctic silver 5) conduct electricity and I feel they are more likely to do damage to components.


Aside from that it's pretty straight forward (sorry I cannot find a picture guide to be clearer). There are screws on the fan keeping the card and there is usually a backplate on the GPU to minimize the pressure points on the PCB. Remove these screws and the card should come apart quite easily. There are thermal pads on the RAM, make sure these go back on when you remount your stock cooler. Once the stock cooler is removed, take a cloth a remove all the thermal paste on the GPU core with a paper towel and Isopropanol Alcohol (please do not use water or any other liquid). Then reapply the new thermal compound (not to much, as it'll insulate the heat, just a note, GPU manufactures normally put a way to much on). Afterwards, backstep and put the cooler back together, please remember to place the thermal pads back on the RAM.

I know this isn't the clearest, I cannot find any tutorials with google that would be of great help to you. If you have any specific questions, feel free to ask. Also, while this may look difficult to do, it's really no harder to do then replacing the thermal compound on your CPU.
James

Edited by james_8970, 09 April 2008 - 05:57 PM.

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#28
strikermed

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Ok, I think I have an understanding. I probably won't be able to do it for a while. I'll have to get a diff thermal compound. Will the artic silver 2 step cleaner work for cleaning? Oh and regards to artic5 should I be using that on my CPU then if it conducts electrocity?
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#29
james_8970

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Oh and regards to artic5 should I be using that on my CPU then if it conducts electrocity?

If you don't apply to much compound, there is no risk for damage on the CPU. On the GPU and NB it's basically the same as the CPU, but there is a much greater margin of error, so I like to suggest ceramic compound just to be on the safe side :)

Will the artic silver 2 step cleaner work for cleaning?

Yes it will, but I recommend getting Isopropanol for the final bit of cleaning, the higher the alcohol the better (I use 99%). It leaves little to no residue behind because it evaporates so quickly (unlike water), which is exactly what you want when you are doing this.

Just a little tip, it's best to start removing the heatsink immediately after you were stressing it (gaming session in this case). When you do this, the thermal compound is warm and not quite as "sticky". I've seen people literally remove their north bridge from the motherboard's PCB due to the thermal compound not wanting to let go of the chip or the heatpipe.

Whenever you start doing this, just bump this thread if you have any questions. :)
James

Edited by james_8970, 11 April 2008 - 12:28 PM.

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#30
strikermed

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Alright thankyou James.
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