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Power Supply


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#1
evanh

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I just ordered a new computer after the demise of my old on and realized (much to my dismay) that the power supply was only 250 watts. I had originally intended using my old Nvidia 7600 pci-e graphics card in it but I don't know if that power supply will support it. Should I install that graphics card or MUST I replace the power supply and if so, how big of a power supply do I need? This is that computer: http://www.tigerdire...AIN#detailspecs

Thanks.
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#2
Troy

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Hi evanh, welcome to Geeks to Go!

I am shocked that the system you have purchased only has a 250W PSU. I would suggest that you should upgrade this without the additional video card being factored into the equation.

I strongly recommend you upgrade the PSU to a quality unit. The 7600 series cards are older now, but still a decent choice. I would suggest the minimum you choose be this one. This should provide more than ample watts and amps on the +12V rail for that system. It also has a high efficiency factor - and Corsair make some of the best PSU's out there, so you can rest assured this one would run your system well.

Cheers

Troy
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#3
evanh

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Thanks for the reply! Is there anything that will work that isn't so expensive? I am a high school student buying this on my own so money is a concern. Thanks.
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#4
evanh

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How about one of these http://www.tigerdire....asp?CatId=1078.
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#5
kamille316

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Give us a budget and we'll suggest something, I strongly suggest not getting an Ultra power supply.
The Corsair power supply Troy has suggested would probably the best one to get for its price.
Power supply is a major component you shouldn't cheap out on as in most cases, when it dies it takes out the other components with it.

Edited by kamille316, 07 April 2008 - 09:24 AM.

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#6
Troy

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Hi again,

I still stand by my first recommendation, but if you must go cheaper, then hopefully this one will treat you nicely.

Cheers

Troy
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#7
evanh

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I really appreciate all of your help. I'm not trying to be difficult but those I've talked to can't see how I'd need that many watts. Is my computer really going to use all that or will much go to waste?
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#8
Troy

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Hi there,

On the Newegg website, there was a good PSU that had less watts than the Antec Earthwatts 430W, but it was more expensive. Currently you are getting a savings deal of $20.00 on that PSU, and it would be the absolute minimum I would suggest. I still would personally choose the Corsair, as they are a better manufacturer in my opinion. That being said, I own a higher-end Antec myself - and find it fantastic!

I have had cheaper PSU's in the past, and they have burnt out - rendering my RAM and motherboard faulty. Luckily the whole unit was under warranty at the time, or I would have been up for quite some $$$. As you can imagine, ever since, I only recommend quality product lines from quality manufacturer's. There's a reason why their PSU's are more expensive - they use more reliable components inside the units, and often have better build quality (and better quality standards testing procedures).

As for your question specifically: Your computer may not use all of those watts, but it isn't going to waste neither. Your computer will take what it needs from the PSU. Anything extra is available if needed, but otherwise will not be used. It's highly recommended that you do have more than you need as "headroom", so if ever down the line you want to upgrade (or add extra components), you know your PSU is already up to the task. Let's not forget we're already at the bottom of the scale as far as power is concerned. :)

Cheers

Troy
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#9
evanh

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OK. Sounds like I'm getting the Corsair. Thanks a lot for your help and patience!

Edited by evanh, 08 April 2008 - 11:11 AM.

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