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Connect to the internet while router is turned off?


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#1
Dominicc2003

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Hi everyone,
Is there a method of getting internet access to my room when Ethernet plugs are far away from it and the wireless router is switched off?

The type of thing I was thinking is maybe using the bt homeplug (shares your connection over your mains electricity so you can use a plug socket as a sort of ethernet port). But the homeplug has to connect to a router so as soon as the router's turned off it doesn't work (I assume)!

Is what I'm asking for impossible?
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#2
Gravity Gripp

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You are correct in assuming that about the only way you're going to be able to get internet access is to use one of those bt plugs. I've never had any experience with it but hopefully it would work for you. May I ask why your wireless router is switched off?
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#3
Dominicc2003

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You are correct in assuming that about the only way you're going to be able to get internet access is to use one of those bt plugs. I've never had any experience with it but hopefully it would work for you. May I ask why your wireless router is switched off?


Well our first wireless router overheated pretty easily and after leaving it on for 36hrs, the inside melted (!!). So now my parents are very paranoid and won't let it stay on at night (the perfect time to run downloads etc)
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#4
Gravity Gripp

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Wow, I knew they could get warm, but I've never heard of one melting. What brand do you have and what is the temperature like in the room that it is stored in?
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#5
Dominicc2003

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Wow, I knew they could get warm, but I've never heard of one melting. What brand do you have and what is the temperature like in the room that it is stored in?


The one that melted was a netgear one, don't know which model. I think it was a white, 802.11b router (probably one of the more common netgear routers).
The one I have now is a thompson one I think (it came with Be* Unlimited broadband).
And the room is pretty cool. I think we were just unlucky.
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#6
Gravity Gripp

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I'm not familiar with that brand, but if you keep the room cool, it will not overheat. I personally run two wireless routers at home for great amounts of time and have never had any issues. If you're worried about it causing a fire, place it on a surface that doesn't burn easy and separate it out from any other equipment.
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#7
Neil Jones

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Routers are designed to be left on 24/7.
If your router melted after 36hrs, it was clearly not fit for purpose and you should have taken it back to where you bought it from and had it replaced.
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