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Transfering a PST file from one company to another.


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#1
magusbuckley

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Hello:

I seriously doubt this is possible, but I have "higher ups" hounding about it.

A guy, at the end of his two weeks notice, archives his Outlook data from his old company and comes to work with us. Now, he wants to open the archive on our network. I've explained to them that I don't think it's possible because he's on a different domain with a different user name and password. Still, they will not let it rest.

I brought his DVD to my office and found the 1.5 GB .pst file. I pulled it from the DVD to my HD and removed the "Read-Only" attribute. Then, when I told Outlook to use it as a data file, it said I don't have access. So now, I feel like I've just confirmed what I said earlier about securities being an issue but I'm hoping that some of you can confirm.

Any and all information would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Brian
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#2
pip22

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Tht's not the only issue, Brian (depending on what you're email client is at your office).
PST files aren't compatible with Windows Mail (I've tried it & it 'broke' WM)
Although PST fles are, of course, compatible with Outlook, it has to be Outlook 2003 or later to run properly on Vista (I've confirmed that too, with
Outlook 2000. It 'broke' Vista this time!)

Assuming none of that applies to you, try putting the PST file into one of your own folders first on drive C:, then importing it into Outlook from there.
That seems to work most people, but then there PST files were from one of their old accounts, not someone elses'.

Edited by pip22, 23 April 2008 - 03:53 PM.

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#3
magusbuckley

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pip22 - thanks for the reply

He's only running Office XP, but he's on Windows XP too so Vista isn't the issue here. In addtion, we're using Outlook and Windows Mail.

I put the archive.pst file on my hard drive and told Outlook to use it as a data file, but it said it was read only. I removed the read-only attribute and tried again. This time it told me I didn't have access.

I was telling Outlook to use it as a data file. You mentioned importing the file. How do you do that?

Thanks,

Magus
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#4
pip22

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I use Outlook 2000 so your menu items may be different depending on the version:

Importing a PST file into Outlook: Open Outlook, go to 'File-->Import and Export.
Under "choose an action to perform" select "Import from another program or file" & click "Next".
Scroll down and select "Personal Folder File (.pst)" & click "Next".
Navigate to where the pst file is located & click "Next".
tick "Include sub-folders" & click "Finish"

Any options I haven't mentioned leave at default.

Edited by pip22, 24 April 2008 - 04:21 PM.

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#5
magusbuckley

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pip22:

Thanks. It worked. His current version of Office was XP and his old version was 03 so I upgraded him to 07. The import didn't put the data where I had hoped it would, but it still got imported.

Thanks for you help.

Magus
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