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finding the origins of an email


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#1
Fibonacci

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Hi guys,

first post and I'm already asking for help !! I was looking into buying a car online, it all seemed to good to be true etc until te seller came up with the usual "it's located in anouther country speil". So i realised it must be a scam! Anyhow, below is the header from one of the emails i received. Im just wondering out of curiosity which ip address is the senders? If it's there at all!!!


X-Message-Info: JGTYoYF78jEHjJx36Oi8+Z3TmmkSEdPt3Mi6GgUSv7yYKHQgGfDe+2wCW4LegkYQav29Pp7Mm4E=
Received: from hu-out-0506.google.com ([72.14.214.237]) by bay0-mc5-f8.bay0.hotmail.com with Microsoft SMTPSVC(6.0.3790.2668);
Thu, 24 Apr 2008 13:35:00 -0700
Received: by hu-out-0506.google.com with SMTP id 27so17245hub.15
for <MYEMAIL@hotmail.com>; Thu, 24 Apr 2008 13:34:59 -0700 (PDT)
DKIM-Signature: v=1; a=rsa-sha256; c=relaxed/relaxed;
d=googlemail.com; s=gamma;
h=domainkey-signature:received:received:message-id:date:from:to:subject:in-reply-to:mime-version:content-type:references;
bh=qaqqI1zRsPedItj6iX05oitBDc6UAxow8a9wzeUraKM=;
b=gQp6JbJ4TPqexDCo8xVQtThk+OmZWnSfVGsoBiDPIk7rXsmrTt9wNdKxBELH1A7OArTrwUofWiTALP
VCSSu1svcyGOni4I0E3ziCWaPuL4SOGparp8otEuip6ZSoaJIBNGtdFCsZbJbexkXqdRWZ42kX0PYtLv+
wH+VUpEBIFPc=
DomainKey-Signature: a=rsa-sha1; c=nofws;
d=googlemail.com; s=gamma;
h=message-id:date:from:to:subject:in-reply-to:mime-version:content-type:references;
b=qDOozUjEkUSOa5ovdOiB3jrpyJq2sUttjidX+vpsOqbcHaVm4WgOQwuZZvYmGEtidzrZxpkkL/giiFafM5PQok7iV7tGiohD7yAGzQAQX1BuvcvzPZ2f/c/OhiIng2T1yhn4Dp89gZ0gWkbBo3l99lEj++SfCVHkQWZiFR89PmY=
Received: by 10.66.216.7 with SMTP id o7mr9448612ugg.39.1209069298863;
Thu, 24 Apr 2008 13:34:58 -0700 (PDT)
Received: by 10.66.244.15 with HTTP; Thu, 24 Apr 2008 13:34:58 -0700 (PDT)
Message-ID: <ae20c8cd0804241334s3abc5872yaf9470c402a8579a@mail.gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Apr 2008 13:34:58 -0700
From: "Maria Hurley" <maria1hurley@googlemail.com>
To: "me" <MYEMAIL@hotmail.com>
Subject: Re: FW: Car Buyers Guide - Enquiry about your Mini Cooper from www.cbg.ie
In-Reply-To: <BAY119-W358005CD3EF932E7C61D44E7E20@phx.gbl>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
boundary="----=_Part_145_8303543.1209069298838"
References: <4CBDD36FC64E4B0A8F5C427ED7DC4DB5@ad00.page7.ie>
<ae20c8cd0804241035v30b6d891lbd575ff93333ca95@mail.gmail.com>
<BAY119-W358005CD3EF932E7C61D44E7E20@phx.gbl>
Return-Path: maria1hurley@googlemail.com
X-OriginalArrivalTime: 24 Apr 2008 20:35:00.0323 (UTC) FILETIME=[AACA3B30:01C8A64A]


Is it the underlined bit?


thanks for your help guys.
:)
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#2
Neil Jones

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General rule of thumb when buying online:

If in doubt about the authenticity of an email, delete it and have nothing more to do with it. If its too good to be true it usually is and this applies to pretty much everything in life.
An IP address will not be of any help to you at all because it'll just tell you where the sender is allegedly from - it can be forged.

Assuming you haven't paid any money or handed over any details that could result in financial fraud, I strongly recommend you leave the issue as it stands now and seek your car elsewhere.
If you have paid or sent cheques or anything like that, contact your bank and/or card company and stop the payments being honoured before you find yourself really out of pocket.

Personally I would never buy anything like a car online. I'd want to see it in person, drive it round the block and have the input of somebody else before I committed.
You could be buying a dangerous, non-road worthy mobile rust bucket, or a stolen car or a car that's been written off by insurance.
In any case if you buy from a reputable garage then the car would have to be road-worthy, legal and up to standard before it can be sold anyway. Yes it costs more but peace of mind.
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#3
Fibonacci

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General rule of thumb when buying online:

If in doubt about the authenticity of an email, delete it and have nothing more to do with it. If its too good to be true it usually is and this applies to pretty much everything in life.
An IP address will not be of any help to you at all because it'll just tell you where the sender is allegedly from - it can be forged.

Assuming you haven't paid any money or handed over any details that could result in financial fraud, I strongly recommend you leave the issue as it stands now and seek your car elsewhere.
If you have paid or sent cheques or anything like that, contact your bank and/or card company and stop the payments being honoured before you find yourself really out of pocket.

Personally I would never buy anything like a car online. I'd want to see it in person, drive it round the block and have the input of somebody else before I committed.
You could be buying a dangerous, non-road worthy mobile rust bucket, or a stolen car or a car that's been written off by insurance.
In any case if you buy from a reputable garage then the car would have to be road-worthy, legal and up to standard before it can be sold anyway. Yes it costs more but peace of mind.


Cheers for the reply. :) Yea it was just advertised online, and I mailed her asking her/him to view the car and the sent me on the usual waffle about the car actually been in a different country. alarm bells went off, and I havnt been in touch since then.
didn't realise they could forge their ip address though, crazy stuff! i find it hard to unerstand how you can recieve something and not know where it came from!
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#4
Neil Jones

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Spammers use every trick in the book and their own rules to hide their origins. Emails like these are just the same sort of idea. They're just virtual confidence tricksters and just as confidence tricksters work in real life, they just want the money. In this day and age they can do it over the Internet.
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