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Can Someone Help Me Convert This Voltz Amount To Watts?


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#1
superstar

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Ok :) Ok :) I know I'm going to get harassed here for asking this question. It still has to do with hardware so don't fret! I can't post this in the audio and video section of the forums because I'M THE ONE WHO ANSWERS THOSE THREADS 90% of the time since almost no one frequents there for months. Leaving a lot of geekstogo.com members stranded.

Anyways I bought a new 37" Inch Flatscreen TV... It's hooked up to the same surge bar as my computer. My pc is worth $3000 easily... So it's actually worth more than the tv since we got it on sale for $800. Well before I got this new tv I used to have an old 1990's type 23" inch tv on the same surge bar as my pc, but it's obviously out of the room now since it's replaced by the new tv we bought.

Well the old tv had these power specs:

AC 120v
60 Hz
115 Watts

The new tv has these power specs:

AC 100 - 240v
50/60Hz
1.8A


I never had any problems using the old tv on the same surge bar my pc is connected to. I'm quite scared that the new tv may draw too much power or something, and ruin my pc since it's on the same surge bar. That it may make the lights go out in my house and trip the breaker downstairs in the basement. I don't understand the new tv's power specs since it says AC 100 - 240v. So what I'd like to know is:

1. Does the new tv use more power than the old one?

2. Can you please tell me how many watts the new tv uses? I don't know how to convert that stuff from it's specs.

3. I'm assuming it says AC 100-240v on the new tv because the power it draws varies when you do stuff like turn the volume up louder or something like that right? Because if not than why wouldn't it just say AC 100v or AC 240v by itself?

4. If the new tv does use more power than the old tv I shouldn't worry unless the circuit breaker goes off and shuts the lights out in my house right? I believe those are meant to turn off power when there is too much electricity flowing through a single outlet no?


I'll have peace of mind using my pc on the same surge bar as my new tv, providing my new tv requires less or roughly the same wattage as my old tv. Because the old one never gave me any kind of problem for years while using it at the same time I used my pc.


- Thank You

Edited by superstar, 06 May 2008 - 12:39 PM.

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#2
Tyger

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Watts equals volts times amps. You old tv used nearly one amp at 120 volts, so your new one uses 1.8 times as much power.
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#3
The Skeptic

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W = V x A. Watts equals the multiplication of volts with amperes.

If you line in the US or Canada where the grid voltage is about 110 volt then the new TV draws 110 X 1.8 = 198 Watt.

If you live in a country that grid voltage is about 220 volt (practically the rest of the world) then you draw 220 x 1.8 = 396 Watt.

The new TV can be set to work in either grids without adding any hardware. With older system you needed a special transformer to shift from one grid to the other.
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#4
superstar

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Well here's some more details about the power in my house. Specifically the power going to my bedroom where the tv and pc are being plugged into a surge bar, which is than plugged into the wall outlet.

This is the box down in the basement. The switch that controls the room where the tv and pc is being pointed at by an arrow. I don't know if you can see the details on the switch well from the picture but it says 15 right on the switch, below that 10ka, and under than it says 120/240v.

Posted Image

This is the surge bar I'm using for the tv and my pc. This is an old picture so NO all of this stuff is not plugged into it right now lol.

Posted Image
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#5
123Runner

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The circuit breaker you are pointing to is a 15 amp breaker. What that means is that if the TOTAL amperage gets to 15 amps on that line, the breaker will trip. That is the safety feature to prevent overheating and electrical fires.
The 15 amp is pretty much standard for outlets in a home. The breaker size (15, 20. 25, 30, etc.) is matched to the size of the wire that is run to the outlets. DO NOT EVER CHANGE THE SIZE TO A LARGER SIZE. THIS WILL CREATE FUTURE PROBLEMS. If you have a problem with a breaker contantly tripping, you need to find out why. If you install a larger breaker, it will not trip till a higher amperage. This will cause fires and component failure.

With that said, you are probably fine with what you have. If you are really paranoid, you need to find out what is powered by that breaker. Keep in mind it can be a light switch or an outlet. Add up the amps that every component draws when RUNNING/ ON. They most likely will not total more that 15 amps.
A motor draws more a startup. If you plug a heater or hair dryer or toaster in, they will draw a lot of amps. Chances are that you will not have all components plugged in and running all the time.

Assuming you are running 120vac (from your old TV specs), 115 watts, your old TV draws .95 amps as stated.
Your new TV will draw 1.8 amps and has 216 watts as previously stated.

As The skeptic stated, your new TV is more user friendly. New components are being built with universal components. They will "switch" between 120 vac and 220 easier. Thats the internal components such as power supplies. If you took your TV to another country, you could use it. You would need an adapter plug because the outlets are different.

Hope this clears it up.
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#6
superstar

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Well I understand most of what you all are saying. But I guess my real question is:

Is it bad to have my new tv, pc, monitor, & modem, on one surge bar, which is connected to one outlet?

Will my pc be damaged when it's on and I decide to turn on the tv? [BTW I don't really notice any light dimming on my ceiling light bulb when I turn on the tv. I do notice a slight dim on my ceiling light bulb when I turn on my pc monitor]
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#7
The Skeptic

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It depends on the specs of the surge bar. The combined load of the devices should be less then the capacity of the bar by about 30-50 percent to keep the bar cool and leave a safety margin.
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#8
superstar

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It depends on the specs of the surge bar. The combined load of the devices should be less then the capacity of the bar by about 30-50 percent to keep the bar cool and leave a safety margin.



So your saying I shouldn't just add up all of the equipment running on one circuit breaker, but to also stay below the max of my surge bar which my pc and tv are plugged into. I don't know much about surge bar maximums and all I see is an energy JOULE rating on it. I read that 1 JOULE = 1 WATT on wikipedia.org, but I may be wrong as that could be my misinterpretation from reading late at night. Anyways if that is what 1 JOULE is, does that mean if I have a power surge bar which is rated 1000 JOULES. I can't put over 1000 watts of equipment connected to it?
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#9
The Skeptic

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If the surge protector is rated at 1000 watt then I wouldn't load more then 700. The reason is that when you start electric equipment, especially where motors are involved (fans, hard disks etc.) the momentary output demand is much higher then when the equipment is running.
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#10
superstar

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I still don't understand what Joules converts into Watts? If my surge bar says it can only handle 1000 Joules does that mean you can only connect a maximum amount of 1000 Watts to it? I want to know what one Joule is = as a Watt.


Thanks

Edited by superstar, 07 May 2008 - 09:34 PM.

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#11
The Skeptic

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Yes, 1 joule equals one watt. Your surge bar protection is designed to take a load of 1000 joules which are 1000 watt.

Have a look at the conversion table on this link.
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#12
superstar

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Hey thanks a lot that's a great link! That's cleared up a lot for me.

I think I'm going to buy a new surge bar even though this one's still good. It's 7-8 years old but hey it's time for a change. Anybody got any recommendations a cheap simple standard surge bar brand that is actually good? Not some backyard convenient store $1 no names. I saw one at my local department store from some brand named NOMA. Don't know if that brand is any good. I just want a simple bar, no battery back up, just plain and simple with at least 6 outlets on it that can withstand 1000watts/1000joules.
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