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Unable to boot computer WinXp SP2


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#16
FlyersFan

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I ran Memtest86 v2.01 from CD as you suggested. The program consistently fails at Test #5 [Block move, 64 moves], and continues to fail for every failing address.
The memory module is brand new Kingston DDRI 1 GB memory (184 pin DIMM). Since it is new, could it be a bad memory module?

I switched back to the original 512 MB Kingston DDR1 memory module and ran the test again. And the results are the same. The first error occurs at failing address 00000023620 (Test #5 [Block move, 64 moves], Test 98%).

So I have the same error problems using either memory modules. I expect this indicates the problem is not with the memory after all.

Does this help narrow down the possibilities? What next?
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#17
The Skeptic

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It only narrows the options in the sense that memory modules seems to be OK but you have all the other options that I mentioned before. The only things that you can do before declaring the hardware dead is to try what I suggested twice before, regarding moving the video connection (have you done that? van you do this? you never reported about this point). and replacing the psu with a workable one taken from another computer or bout at about 20$.
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#18
FlyersFan

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Thanks for your continuous support.

Unfortunately, I am unable to try the option you suggested regarding the video card.

I am going to take a friend's spare computer and run some tests. I'll swap out my video card, hard drive and PSU and see what results I get.

Thanks again.
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#19
The Skeptic

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Please be aware that installing the hard disk of another computer on yours will almost surely not work. The other disk will have your friend's hardware specifications collected and registered during the installation of windows on his computer. Since yours is different (I assume) most chances are that you will not be able to run it.
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#20
FlyersFan

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Here's the latest:

I tested my memory in another computer and ran memtest and it did not report any errors. So I am confident the RAM is not an issue.

I swapped out the power supply from another computer and the results are the same. So I am confident the PSU is not an issue.

That leaves me with a) Video Card memory, b) motherboard.

I dont' have access to another video card at the moment. Is there a specific software that will test the video card memory?

Also,
I removed the IDE hard drive from my computer and made it a slave on the other computer. When booting the other computer, it says that the drive needs to be checked for consistency. And chkdsk reports a ton of errors. So that confirms there is an issue with the IDE hardrive. However, with that drive out of the equation in my computer, memtest still reports failure. I can assume that whatever is causing the issue on my computer has damaged the hard drive (possibly caused by rebooting several times). The root cause is still unknown.

Any other suggestions?

Edited by FlyersFan, 19 May 2008 - 09:43 AM.

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#21
The Skeptic

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There is another option and that's the CPU. However, there are many more cases in which the motherboard is faulty but the CPU is OK. There is only one way, really, to get to a final answer: swap parts with a computer that have similar (not identical parts). A commercial lab has the advantage of having replacements at hands. Basically they do the same thing: swapping parts to pinpoint the problem. I believe that the motherboard is damaged but I can't be sure.
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#22
FlyersFan

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I have removed all existing hard drives and inserted a 40 GB IDE drive. When trying to install WinXP on the new drives the system gives a BSOD failing on ntfs.sys.
The new hard drive is newly formatted with NTFS.

This may just be another symptom of the original problem. The ntfs.sys file is not corrupt since it only exists on the CD at this time from which I am trying to perform the installation.

Suggestions?


What's important to me now is to ensure the data is safe on my SATA drive. Unfortunatley, my bios is not allowing me to make the SATA drive primary (by design).
The SATA drive contains a copy of the files on my IDE drive from 2 weeks ago. The IDE drive may be corrupted and I am hoping my SATA is not.
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#23
The Skeptic

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The best way to do this is to remove the SATA disk and rig it into another computer. You can do this by connecting it directly to the other computer's motherboard or you can buy an adapter that enables data transfer through a USB port. It's a small device that cost about 25$ where I live.
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