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Freshly Formatted Computer, Really slow


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#1
Infliktah06

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Before I begin, I wasn't really sure where to post this, so I tried to use my judgment. Sorry if the choice was incorrect.
At any rate, I hope someone can help me with this frustrating problem.

After having my old MOBO explode on me, I was forced to pick up a new one, as well as a compatible video card.
Installed the new drivers, and got rid of the old ones in order to start backing up information prior to format.

Before the format, it was unbearable slow, with Windows Task Manager's Performance Tab showing CPU usage remaining in the 80's and up... more often then not in the 95-99% range.

After reformatting, with a fresh copy of windows and what was to be a nice clean start, the computer is still unbearably slow when running a minimal number of programs at a time....which was never really an issue in the past. (Ie. Windows Live Messenger, and iTunes only ) As I'm typing this, CPU Usage remaines above 90% at almost all noted times, more often then not above 95%, or even at 99%. This results in spikes in performance, and unbearably slow speeds, and ultimately; pain-staking usage.

Any advice is appreciated, and any information needed; please let me know. Thanks :)

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#2
cmpm

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click on the process' tab in task manager.
click cpu twice, and it will show what is using so much of your cpu.
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#3
The Skeptic

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I am not sure I completely understand the order of events (especially not the part "Installed the new drivers, and got rid of the old ones") but let's look at it this way: What you have essentially left from the computer is the CPU, hard disk and memory modules. Please do the following:

1: Enter the BIOS and check that CPU's cache memory is enabled.

2: Download HDTune. Click Benchmark and start the test. At the end, please report Average data transfer rate.

3: Open My Computer, right-click local disk C (where the operating system is, i presume) and report Capacity and Free Space.

4: In Task Manager click Performance and report, in Physical Memory, what is the Total and how much is Available.
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#4
Infliktah06

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Although I'm usually pretty literate with computers, I can't seem to find that option in BIOS, and I don't want to proceed until step 1 is done, i'd rather not do anything half-(expletive) LOL!

Sorry, but at any rate, any words of wisdom from anyone? I feel extremely lost!
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#5
The Skeptic

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BIOS versions vary wildly but somewhere there should a line like Level 2 with the option to enable or disable. If you are not sure you can set the BIOS to default values and that will automatically enable cache memory.
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#6
Infliktah06

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Cache memory is enabled...no fix :)
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#7
Infliktah06

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I am not sure I completely understand the order of events (especially not the part "Installed the new drivers, and got rid of the old ones") but let's look at it this way: What you have essentially left from the computer is the CPU, hard disk and memory modules. Please do the following:

1: Enter the BIOS and check that CPU's cache memory is enabled.

2: Download HDTune. Click Benchmark and start the test. At the end, please report Average data transfer rate.

3: Open My Computer, right-click local disk C (where the operating system is, i presume) and report Capacity and Free Space.

4: In Task Manager click Performance and report, in Physical Memory, what is the Total and how much is Available.


1) Done

2) Average Date Transfer Rate is 43.8 MB/Sec

3) Local Disc C; Capacity: 28.6 GB
Free Space: 23.7 GB
4) Performance-> Physical Memory(K)->Total- 1047152
Available- 634900
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#8
The Skeptic

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Please download Process Explorer from the list of links below. Install and run it. Please click all the + signs to expose as many items as possible. Watch the program for a few minutes and report which processes use above 10% or so of CPU power. Please do this while making sure that the computer loaded everything and no updates, of any program, are active.
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#9
Infliktah06

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It appears iTunes hovers around 8-11 percent of my cpu
and "Interrputs" takes in the 70's :S
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#10
PILL5B3RRY

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Try running the computer in Safe Mode.

Safe Mode runs the minimal amount of Services and Programs at Startup, only the essential ones.

To run in Safe Mode, while your computer is booting up, continuously press F8 until a black screen comes up. Choose Safe Mode. Dont choose Safe Mode with Networking or Command Prompt.

*NOTE* You will not have Internet access while on Safe Mode, unless you go on Safe Mode with Networking, so dont freak out when your internet doesn't work :)

While in Safe Mode, try your computer around. Is it still slow like before?

If it isn't then its most likely a bad startup Program or Service.

If it is still slow then please tell us so we can get back to you.

Good Luck,

PILL5B3RRY

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#11
The Skeptic

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It looks as if a process is seeking your HD a lot of the time. Please switch your modem/router off. click Start > run and in the text line type msconfig. Choose Selective Mode and in Startup uncheck everything including antivirus. Boot the computer and tell us if it runs properly. If it does, repeat the process and start checking the unchecked items. Please do this one at a time, starting with the antivirus and iTune. If the computer slows down we will know what cause the problem.

Is it possible that you had malware in your backed-up and restored data? Did you scan it before reinstallation?
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#12
Infliktah06

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Sorry for the slow response!

May 24 took over my life....at ANY rate, in terms of virus whatnot....everything backed up, was clean before, and after i reformatted.

Im going to now try the msconfig option above mentioned, I'll post back soon.
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#13
Infliktah06

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To be honest, I'm not sure which checklists in msconfig I should be disabling things in...
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#14
Avohir

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what may be a dumb question... what speed is your processor registering in at? (right click on my computer, properties)
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#15
The Skeptic

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Click Start > Run. Type msconfig and press enter. choose selective mode and open the startup menu. Uncheck everything and confirm. You will have to reboot and check the box that shows up at latest stage of boot.
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