Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Toggle switches for hard drives?


  • Please log in to reply

#1
powerbuilder333

powerbuilder333

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 37 posts
I'm not sure they make such a thing, but I'd like to have some sort of switch I can attach to the exterior of my case (front or back, without drilling holes) that I can use to power on and off a hard drive.
My goal is to have one (or more) hard drives installed that I can use for data storage, but that aren't spinning constantly during the time that they're not being used.
A 3 switch set up that fits in a 3.5 (or 5.25) exterior drive bay would be ideal.
Does such a device exist?
Thanks to all that can help.
  • 0

Advertisements


#2
SRX660

SRX660

    motto - Just get-er-done

  • Technician
  • 4,345 posts
There is no real reason to do this. Computers have advanced to the point where they are about as efficient as they can get when it comes to electrical usage and wear and tear on the hardware. If this were not the case you would have seen many factory built kits for just what you propose. Most hard drives do not spin up if you don't use them, and they will only run for a little while until they shut down until you need them again. This is why you have settings in the power management for HD standby's, and shutdowns.

SRX660
  • 0

#3
Kemasa

Kemasa

    Nobody

  • Technician
  • 1,575 posts
Actually, one reason to do something like this is so that the disk is not accessible when it is not in use. If the computer were to get a virus, it could still write to the disk, as well as some computer failures such as controller failures, power supply failures, power spikes, etc.


With that being said, I would strong suggest an external case to enclose the disk. You can disconnect it completely or just shut off the power. If you are using IDE drives, there is also the master/slave issue, which means you would need the master on if you wanted to use the slave. Also, if you use an external case, you can power up the disk after you have powered up the system and the disk will become available.
  • 0

#4
Tyger

Tyger

    Member 2k

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,896 posts
I agree with both of the previous posters. You can simply configure the added hard drive to not spin up until you need files from it, and to stop after a certain time of not being accessed. But an external drive for your files is an excellent idea since a power supply failure can wipe out everything on your system, including any drives. And you can completely disconnect it in the event of storms.
  • 0

#5
powerbuilder333

powerbuilder333

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 37 posts
Thanks for your responses.
I'll try the power management option for sure.
I have 3 external drives, but only one has it's own power switch, which means for the others I have to get out of my chair and manually plug them in - I know I'm lazy - lol.
I'm looking into a SATA Backplane. That might be the ideal solution.
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP