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Very Loud Computer...


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#1
n0ng33k

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Lately my computer has been getting extremely loud... it runs quietly at the Windows Loading screen, but as soon as I log on, I'm guessing the fan starts going berserk and, consequently, it gets louder in my computer room. Now I live in a fairly warm area (Vancouver), and I'm guessing that the heat has something to do with it, but then I think about how old my computer is, I rule out the thought that it has a thermometer or something built into it, that tell the fan whether or not to go berserk...however interesting that would be.

Any tips or guides or whatever that could help me eliminate or reduce the sound would help, I'm wearing my noise-reducing headphones as I type this, and I'm anxious to give my ears some fresh air.
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#2
Major Payne

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Very likely you are going to need a new fan, but power down safely, unplug PC and open the side(s). Be very careful to discharge any static electricity by touching the metal chassis before inserting hands. Be careful to not dis-lodge any cables or cards. If PC is extremely dirty, try using an anti-static type brush to clean dirt/dust from fan(s), power supply, processor fan and heat sink fins.

Use compressed air from one of those computer stores or Radio Shack. Use it gently so as not to dis-lodge anything with the air. Once cleaned, plug in PC and power up into Windows. If noise still persists, then a new fan is indicated although I have removed a fan before and sprayed bearing assembly with wd-40 unless it uses a Teflon assembly, then there is a teflon lubricate that can be used.

Ron
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#3
n0ng33k

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Alright, thanks very much Ron.

If no-one replied I probably would have gone deaf with these headphones shoved in my ears all day, but thanks for the tip, I'll do it immediately and see how it works!
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#4
Major Payne

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Good luck and hope to hear some good news. I still wound up replacing a fan in one PC because it was too far gone. Plus, it was the one for the Processor and I didn't want to take a chance in wiping out the processor from heat. Fans are cheaper than processors. :)

Ron
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#5
superstar

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If PC is extremely dirty, try using an anti-static type brush to clean dirt/dust from fan(s), power supply, processor fan and heat sink fins.

Use compressed air from one of those computer stores or Radio Shack. Use it gently so as not to dis-lodge anything with the air. Once cleaned, plug in PC and power up into Windows. If noise still persists, then a new fan is indicated although I have removed a fan before and sprayed bearing assembly with wd-40 unless it uses a Teflon assembly, then there is a teflon lubricate that can be used.

Ron



Sorry to hijack this thread but where in the world would one find a brush like that? I'd like one myself! & second of all spraying a fan bearing with WD-40? I never heard of that one... How would one find out if you need to use wd-40 or some sort of teflon lubricate? & if you do need teflon lubricant where do you get it?


Thanks


Once again sorry for posting questions in this thread.
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#6
Major Payne

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This is just one: StaticMaster (NRD) - StaticMaster Anti-Static Brush - 3"

For more links: Google Search

Teflon Multi-Use Lubricant - 11 Oz. Aerosol

Links to Teflon lubricant: Google Search

I still would recommend replacing a noisy/bad fan(s). Using WD-40 on the metal bearing assembly is just a short term method, but it will remove any dirt particles from places you can't clean with the brush. For any using a Teflon or Teflon-like bearing assembly, the use of the Teflon lubricate seems to be a longer lasting method for those fans, but, again, if it's a fan for the processor, I would prefer to replace it soonest.

Ron
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#7
superstar

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Thanks but how can you tell if the fan needs a teflon spray or wd-40? What do you have to look for when you look at the fan bearing?
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#8
Major Payne

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The type of bearing used has a major influence both on noise and on reliability of the fan. We distinguish between two types of bearing: Ball bearing and sleeve bearing. Generally speaking, ball bearing fans are more expensive, last longer, but are louder than sleeve bearing fans.

The cheapest sleeve bearing type simply consists of a ring made of a porous material dipped in lubricant; the fan axis rotates inside this ring. After prolonged operation, the lubricant will be used up, and the fan will become noisy and eventually fail. This is a common problem especially with small, inexpensive fans like they are used on chipset coolers or coolers of low-end graphics cards.

It may help - as a temporary solution - to lubricate the fan that has become noisy, using standard lube. However, depending on the fan design, the bearing may not be accessible to lubrication from the outside. Sometimes, removing the manufacturer's sticker from the fan will expose the bearing.

The better solution is to replace cheap fans that have become noisy by decent models with a ball bearing; a good ball bearing fan will last for many years of nonstop operation, without any lubrication.

There are also good quality sleeve bearings available, such as the "Sintec" sleeve bearings used by Papst, which use PTFE (also known as Teflon) as bearing material. These are just as expensive as good ball bearings, while maintaining the sleeve bearing's advantage of having lower noise level. Other manufacturers use ceramic materials for their bearings.

One bearing is not enough to stabilize a rotating axis. Fans have two bearings, and many of the "ball bearing" fans actually have one ball bearing, and one sleeve bearing. Larger ball bearing fans should have two ball bearings; they are often sold as "two ball bearing" or just "Two Ball" fans.


Check out about Balancing, too: Information about fans

About Teflon bearings and noise, see Fig. 4.

Ron
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